School of
Social Sciences
___Introduction to Sociology
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Max Weber

 

"Man is dominated by the making of money, by acquisition as the ultimate purpose of his life. Economic acquisition is no longer subordinated to man as the means for the satisfaction of his material needs. This reversal of what we should call the natural relationship, so irrational from a naive point of view, is evidently as definitely a leading principle of capitalism as it is foreign to all peoples not under a capitalist influence"
(The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, 1904)

The Person The Years of Mastery 
Introduction An Exemplary Moralist
The Early Academic Career  
   
The Work  
Introduction The Function of Ideas
Natural Science, Social Science, and Value Relevance Class, Status and Power
The Ideal Type Bureaucracy
Causality and Probability Rationalization and Disenchantment
Types of Authority  

If Christianity is the opium of the people, and optimism is the opium of progressives, Weber provided an antidote to both. Like Marx, Weber's work was wide ranging, the sign of a great intellect. However, it is often said of Weber that, in contrast to Marx, there is no overarching system or point of analysis which brings together the whole work. This is only partially correct. There is one thread running through Weber's work, that of pessimism in the face of the modern world (AB).



Websites On Weber Work By Weber
Max Weber Class Notes (External Link) Bureaucracy
  Fundamental Concepts in Sociology (External Link)
  The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism
   



These pages were originally written by: Angus Bancroft and Sioned Rogers
Redesigned and updated by: Pierre Stapley - 2010