FREE-STANDING MODULE CATALOGUE 2009-2010

CONTENTS

Introduction
Ancient History Modules
Archaeology Modules
Chemistry Modules
City and Regional Planning Modules
Communication Modules
European Languages Literary and Cultural Modules
European Languages French Modules
European Languages German Modules
European Languages Italian Module
European Languages Political and Social Modules
History and Welsh History Modules
Lifelong Learning Computing Modules
Lifelong Learning English Modules
Lifelong Learning History and Archaeology Modules
Lifelong Learning Language Modules (European)
Lifelong Learning Language Modules (Non-European)
Lifelong Learning Law and Business Modules
Lifelong Learning Music Modules
Lifelong Learning Philosophy Modules
Lifelong Learning Science and Environment Modules
Lifelong Learning Social Studies Modules
Mathematics Modules
Nursing and Midwifery Modules
Physics and Astronomy Modules
Physiology Modules
Psychology Modules
Religious and Theological Studies Modules
Welsh Modules
Welsh Modules/Modiwlau Cymraeg a Chymreig
Appendix 1: List of Programmes

INTRODUCTION

This catalogue contains information on free-standing modules. This catalogue has been made available only on the web although there will be copies available in your school for ease of reference. As a full-time student at Cardiff you will normally take modules to the value of 120 credits in each year of your chosen programme. Within these 120 credits, your programme may provide you with the opportunity to take free-standing modules . A list of the programmes which offer this choice is given in Appendix 1.

Modules

Modules are courses of study which are offered on a free-standing basis in one of the following ways:

A single module

A module worth ten credits normally taught within a single semester, representing one sixth of the semester's workload.

A double module (Autumn & Spring Semester)

A module worth twenty credits taught over both the Autumn and Spring semesters, representing a sixth of the workload for the whole academic year.

A double module: either Autumn Semester or Spring Semester

A module worth twenty credits taught within a single semester, representing a third of the semester's workload.

Free-standing Modules

One of the major benefits to students who are pursuing a modular programme of study is the added opportunity to choose modules from outside their own degree programmes. Free-standing modules allow this to happen and you may wish to opt for them for a variety of reasons:

  • for personal interest;
  • in order to gain knowledge and skills in another subject area related to your own discipline, perhaps lending a different perspective to your main studies;
  • in order to widen the range of your personal skills and knowledge and so improve your career prospects.

All the modules listed in this catalogue are free-standing. You should note, however, that entry onto some free-standing modules is subject to certain conditions.

Selecting Free-Standing Modules

  • At the bottom of this document there is a list (Appendix 1) of those degree programmes which permit students to take free-standing modules as part of their programme of study. To avoid disappointment, please check carefully to ensure that the programme (and the relevant year of study) on which you are registered is included on the list before you start to consider which free-standing module(s) to choose.
  • You also need to check the level of choice permitted before selecting modules from this catalogue. It may help to ask yourself the following questions:
  • "Can I study any free-standing module?"
  • " How many free-standing modules may I choose?"
  • "Is the module of my choice available in the right semester ?"
  • Look carefully through the individual entries in this catalogue and identify the modules which you may wish to study.
  • Ensure that you satisfy any of the specified prerequisites. For example, some free-standing modules require students to have certain background knowledge or skills, while a few others specify that students must have pursued or passed another module.
  • Contact the member of academic staff or the school office named if you would like more information on the module.
You are advised that any free-standing module chosen must fit into the teaching timetable of the other modules you are studying.

Signing up for Free-standing Modules

The final step in the process is signing up for the module of your choice through the module selection process. Before selecting a module on-line you should contact the academic school(s) responsible for the module(s) which you wish to study. The school will provide you with more detailed information and advice on the availability and suitability of the module. You should then select the module from the list of free-standing modules as part of your module selection.

Availability of Modules

All students are notified that the modules advertised or referred to in this catalogue are liable to be changed or withdrawn, both before and after selection, for any reason including those set out below. Cardiff University accepts no responsibility for any such change or withdrawals of modules and students select modules at their own risk.
Reasons which may cause the change or withdrawal of modules include the loss of any key member of staff or insufficient take-up of modules by students; this list is not exhaustive.

Definitions of Terms

As you read through the catalogue, you may come across a number of terms which are new to you. The following definitions may help you.

Credit: The value of a unit of study where each single module shall normally have a value of ten credits.

Precursor Module: A module, the study hours of which a student shall be required to have completed in order to proceed to a subsequent specified module or modules, but for which credit may not necessarily have been awarded.

Prerequisite Module: A module in which a student shall be required to have received credit in order to proceed to a subsequent specified module or modules.

Programme of Study:A schedule of approved modules leading to a designated award.

SEMESTER DATES: SESSION 2009 - 2010

AUTUMN SEMESTER

Monday 21 September 2009 – Sunday 24 January 2010
(Christmas Recess: Saturday 12 December 2009 – Sunday 3 January 2010).

SPRING SEMESTER

Monday 25 January 2010 - Friday 11 June 2010
(Easter Recess: Saturday 20 March 2010 – Sunday 11 April 2010).

 

ANCIENT HISTORY MODULES

HS4351 - ARMY & SOCIETY: HOMER TO ALEXANDER
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
Warfare was part of normal life for almost all ancient Greeks, and military developments often had the most profound political and social effects. This module examines the military, social, economic and cultural aspects of ancient Greek warfare, and focuses on changes in the modes of combat - from Homeric, to Hoplite warfare, to the Macedonian phalanx - and on the impact of war on the economy and society of Greece.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 lectures and at least 2 seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 hour written examination (Autumn) 60%, 1 piece of written work 40%.
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite modules: HS2102 or HS3101
CONDITIONS: Suitable for students studying at levels Two and Three only, subject to approval by the relevant Board of Studies and restrictions in numbers.
Contact: Dr L Rawlings (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS3371 - ATHENS IN THE AGE OF DEMOSTHENES AND LYKOURGOS
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
On the accession of Philip II to the Macedonian throne in 359 Athens was one of the most powerful cities in Greece and confident leader of an alliance of Aegean states. By 321 the Greek world had been transformed by the military and political successes of Philip and his son, Alexander the Great. For Athens, military defeat in 338 was followed by loss of Empire, erosion of freedom and eventually, in 322, the installation of a Macedonian garrison and the extinction of democracy. Never again was Athens to be a fully independent city. The course will study aspects of the history of Athens during this period, e.g. her management of the transition from imperial polis to subordinate ally of Macedon, focussing on the two most important types of primary source available: the Attic orators (a speech of Demosthenes, Aeschines, Lykourgos, Dinarchos or Hypereides will be studied in detail) and inscriptions (a translated selection). The course will also deal with broader historical topics illuminated by these sources, e.g. the structures and ideology of Athenian law in the 4th century democracy, and, depending on the speech studied, e.g. Greek homosexuality or Athenian citizenship.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 lectures; 2 seminars; directed reading.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One essay (50%); one 1-hour examination (50%)
REQUISITES: Module HS3101 Introduction to Ancient Greek History
Contact: Dr S Lambert (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS3314 - EXPANSION AND CONFLICT IN THE GREEK POLEIS
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
From the seventh century BC onwards Greek Society and politics underwent rapid and remarkable transformations, including the rise of the city-state, early ""colonisation"", military developments and the emergence of tyrants, and the beginnings of democracy at Athens and elsewhere. These developments led to an increasing self-awareness and the growth of Panhellenic identity, as the Greeks came into contact with foreign cultures and engaged in decisive conflicts with the Persian Empire. The dramatic success of the Greek states in the Persian Wars led to the development of competing claims to the leadership of Greece by Athens and Sparta. The rising power of the Athenian Empire was finally checked by the long and destructive 'Peloponnesian War' (431-404 BC). This module examines all these processes with a particular attention to the sources of the period, above all the Histories of the two greatest Greek Historians, Herodotus and Thucydides.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Approximately 30 one-hour lectures; 6 seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One essay (35%); two class tests (best of three) (15%); one 2-hour examination (50%).
REQUISITES: Module HS3101 Introduction to Ancient Greek History
Contact: Dr S Lambert, Dr L Rawlings (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS3330 - GODS & THE POLIS: ATHENIAN FESTIVALS
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
The religious festivals and rituals of each classical city-state reflected the general Greek religious system of practices and beliefs, while helping to define and reinforce the social and political identities of each state and of smaller social groups within it. The module concentrates on the analysis of festivals, cults and beliefs of Athens, one of the most powerful and influential states, and the one for which there is the most evidence, literary, documentary and archaeological.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 lectures and at least 2 seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 hour written examination (Autumn) 50%, 1 piece of written work 50%.
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite modules: HS2102 or HS3101.
Contact: Dr S Tougher (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS3345 - GREEK HISTORICAL TEXTS
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
Students will study a selection of Greek texts, both historical and epigraphic (to a value of 25 OCT pages) chosen with reference to the Ancient History modules studied in that term. Texts will be chosen from a selection of authors which might include Herodotus, Thucydides, Euripides, Aristophanes, Xenophon, Arrian and Plutarch, and selected inscriptions. Texts will be studied for both grammatical structure, and their importance to historical debates. Classes will involve translation and grammatical comment, as well as discussion of the relevance of the chosen texts to particular periods of history.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 Classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Assessment of the course will be in the form of one TWO-HOUR paper: passages will be set from the prescribed tests for translation and comment. [Dictionaries will not be permitted in examinations.]
REQUISITES: Prerequisites: HS3423 Reading Greek 1 AND HS3324 Reading Greek 2, passed with a grade of at least 60% (or a good A-level in Ancient Greek, or RT3101 and RT3102 Hellenistic Greek passed with a grade of at least 60%, or equivalent qualification).
CONDITIONS: Suitable for students studying at levels Two and Three only, subject to approval by the relevant Board of Studies and restrictions in numbers.
Contact: Dr S Tougher (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS3346 - GREEK HISTORICAL TEXTS
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
Students will study a selection of Greek texts, both historical and epigraphic (to a value of 25 OCT pages) chosen with reference to the Ancient History modules studied in that term. Texts will be chosen from a selection of authors which might include Herodotus, Thucydides, Euripides, Aristophanes, Xenophon, Arrian and Plutarch, and selected inscriptions. Texts will be studied for both grammatical structure, and their importance to historical debates. Classes will involve translation and grammatical comment, as well as discussion of the relevance of the chosen texts to particular periods of history.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 Classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Assessment of the course will be in the form of one TWO-HOUR paper: passages will be set from the prescribed tests for translation and comment. [Dictionaries will not be permitted in examinations.]
REQUISITES: Prerequisites: HS3423 Reading Greek 1 AND HS3324 Reading Greek 2, passed with a grade of at least 60% (or a good A-level in Ancient Greek, or RT3101 and RT3102 Hellenistic Greek passed with a grade of at least 60%, or equivalent qualification).
CONDITIONS: Suitable for students studying at levels Two and Three only, subject to approval by the relevant Board of Studies and restrictions in numbers.
Contact: Dr S Tougher (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS4363 - HOUSES IN ROMAN ITALY
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is an introduction to the study of ancient houses, focusing on Roman Italy in the late Republic and early Principate (second century BC to second century AD). The Roman house was not just a family home: it was also a political power-base, a theatre for social climbing, and a place of business. The course looks at well-preserved examples of Roman housing, such as those at Pompeii and Ostia, and literary sources which illuminate the role of the house in Roman family, social and political life. Major themes include: methods of understanding and interpreting houses; concepts of public and private space; ways of ‘reading’ decoration and architectural forms; Roman debates about luxury and propriety; the economic role of the house; the development of Imperial palaces.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 lectures; at least 2 seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 piece written work 50%, 1 hour examination (Autumn) 50%.
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Modules: HS2102 or HS3102.
CONDITIONS: Suitable for students studying at levels Two and Three only, subject to approval by the relevant Board of Studies.
Contact: Dr R Westgate (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS3101 - INTRODUCTION TO ANCIENT GREEK HISTORY
Level 1 Module Double Semester 20 credits
The Greeks invented democracy, and have profoundly influenced Western political thought, art, philosophy and literature. This introductory double module studies three periods, with detailed reference to the major historical sources. First it attempts to reconstruct early Greek history, institutions and society, using the works of the first great epic poet, Homer, the ""Iliad"" and the ""Odyssey"". Then it examines the emergence of the Greek city-states, the conflict of east versus west through the perspective of Herodotus, and the history of Athens in the fifth century, considering the development of democracy, the acquisition of empire and subsequent conflict with rival Sparta (detailed in Thucydides' history), and the social, economic and intellectual life of the city (especially issues of gender and slavery). Finally the course deals with the emergence of Macedon in the fourth century, and the conquests of Alexander.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Approximately 20 hours of lectures and 4 hours of seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One essay (35%); one group presentation (15%); one 2-hour examination (50%).
Contact: Dr S Tougher, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS3102 - INTRODUCTION TO ROMAN HISTORY
Level 1 Module Double Semester 20 credits
The Romans had a profound influence on the political and cultural history of the Mediterranean lands, particularly Europe. The languages, architectural styles, religions, legal and political institutions of many countries are based on or influenced by Roman precursors. This double module provides an introduction to Roman History and society, paying particular attention to the Republic and the transformation of the state to monarchy under Augustus, and the later Roman empire, the adoption of Christianity and the creation of the institutions of early Medieval Europe. Throughout the year, the course will focus on social and cultural values as well as political and military events, with detailed reference to contemporary historical sources such as poetry, history, letters and legal texts, and key architectural and artistic works.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Approximately 20 hours of lectures and 4 hours of seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One essay (35%); one group presentation (15%); one 2-hour examination (50%).
Contact: Dr S Tougher, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS3343 - LATIN HISTORICAL TEXTS
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
Students will study a selection of Latin texts, both historical and epigraphic (to a value of 25 OCT pages) chosen with reference to the Ancient History modules studied in that term. Texts will be chosen from a selection which might include, Livy, Virgil, Catullus, Tacitus Annals, Pliny Letters, Cicero, and selected inscriptions. Texts will be studied for both grammatical structure, and their importance to historical debates. Classes will involve translation and grammatical comment, as well as discussion of the relevance of the chosen texts to particular periods of history.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 Classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Assessment of the course will be in the form of one TWO-HOUR paper: passages will be set from the prescribed tests for translation and comment. [Dictionaries will not be permitted in examinations.]
REQUISITES: Prerequisites: HS3421 Reading Latin 1 AND HS3322 Reading Latin 2, passed with a grade of at least 60% (or a good A-Level in Latin, or equivalent qualification).
CONDITIONS: Suitable for students studying at levels Two and Three only, subject to approval by the relevant Board of Studies and restrictions in numbers.
Contact: Dr S Tougher (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS3344 - LATIN HISTORICAL TEXTS
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
Students will study a selection of Latin texts, both historical and epigraphic (to a value of 25 OCT pages) chosen with reference to the Ancient History modules studied in that term. Texts will be chosen from a selection which might include, Livy, Virgil, Catullus, Tacitus Annals, Pliny Letters, Cicero, and selected inscriptions. Texts will be studied for both grammatical structure, and their importance to historical debates. Classes will involve translation and grammatical comment, as well as discussion of the relevance of the chosen texts to particular periods of history.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 Classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Assessment of the course will be in the form of one TWO-HOUR paper: passages will be set from the prescribed tests for translation and comment. [Dictionaries will not be permitted in examinations.]
REQUISITES: Prerequisites: HS3421 Reading Latin 1 AND HS3322 Reading Latin 2, passed with a grade of at least 60% (or a good A-Level in Latin, or equivalent qualification).
CONDITIONS: Suitable for students studying at levels Two and Three only, subject to approval by the relevant Board of Studies and restrictions in numbers.
Contact: Dr S Tougher (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS4358 - LIFE IN ANCIENT ROME
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module provides an opportunity to study what it was like to live in the city of Rome in the late Republic and early Empire, for both rich and poor. The course covers topics such as how the city was administered, ""Bread and Circuses"", the various forms of leisure activity and more 'down to earth' subjects such as the quality of housing, the water supply & other urban amenities. Students will be encouraged to study the importance of social institutions in public and private life, and the changes that occurred from Republic to Empire.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 lectures; at least 2 seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 piece written work 60%, 1 hour examination (Autumn) 40%.
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Modules: HS2102 or HS3102.
CONDITIONS: Suitable for students studying at levels Two and Three only, subject to approval by the relevant Board of Studies.
Contact: Dr K Gilliver (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS3324 - READING GREEK 2
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 20 credits
Further study of the Greek language, involving the reading and understanding of more advanced Classical Greek Texts.
METHODS OF TEACHING: approximately 30 seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One 3-hour examination (100%)
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Module: HS3423.
CONDITIONS: Suitable for students studying at levels Two and Three only, subject to approval by the relevant Board of Studies.
Contact: Dr J Lössl (School of Religious Studies)
 
HS3423 - READING GREEK I
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
An introduction to the Greek language, involving the reading of simple Classical Greek texts.
METHODS OF TEACHING: approximately 30 seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Three 50-minute supervised coursework exercises in class (100%).
CONDITIONS: Suitable for students studying at levels Two and Three only, subject to approval by the relevant Board of Studies.
Contact: Dr J Lössl (School of Religious Studies)
 
HS3421 - READING LATIN 1
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
An introduction to the Latin Language, involving the reading of relatively simple Latin texts.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 30 classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour unseen translation examination (Autumn) 50% and translation exercises 50%.
CONDITIONS: Suitable for students studying at levels Two and Three only, subject to approval by the relevant Board of Studies.
Contact: Dr R Evans (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS3322 - READING LATIN 2
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 20 credits
Further study of the Latin language, building upon the work of HS3421 Reading Latin I, and involving the reading of more advanced Latin texts.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 30 classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour unseen translation examination (Spring) 50% and translation exercises 50%.
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Module: HS3421. CONDITIONS: Suitable for students studying at levels Two and Three only, subject to approval by the relevant Board of Studies.
Contact: Dr R Evans (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS3317 - ROMAN IMPERIAL HISTORY 31BC - AD138
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The Principate created by Augustus ended the civil wars of the late Republic, and ushered in a new monarchical form of government that is often considered to have reached its apogee in the reign of Trajan and Hadrian. This module uses historical writings and contemporary documents and monuments to examine the course of the Julio-Claudian and Flavian dynasties and their successors, and how under their control the Empire experienced a period of relative peace and prosperity. It considers the main developments and events of the period in Rome and the provinces, and charts the increasing importance of Rome's provinces, both socially and politically. In addition, the course examines the images and ideologies of imperial government created at Rome, and the extent to which this government was accepted or rejected in the provinces.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Approximately 30 one-hour lectures; 6 seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One essay (35%); two class tests, (15%); one 2-hour examination (50%).
REQUISITES: Module HS3102 Introduction to Roman History.
Contact: Dr G Bradley (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS3331 - ROMAN RELIGION
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
Roman religious rituals appear utterly traditional, yet were in fact subject to constant change and development, to influence from the Greek world, and to control by the state. The module studies the main features of Roman beliefs and practices, as they originated, and as they developed during the period when Rome became a major world power and reacted to contacts with other religious systems.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 lectures; at least 2 seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 piece of written work 50%, 1 hour examination (Spring) 50%.
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Modules: HS3102 or HS2102 or RT1101 and RT1102 or RT1101 and RT6102.
Contact: Dr G Bradley (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS4364 - THE ETRUSCANS: HISTORY AND SOCIETY
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
The Etruscans are considered ‘mysterious’ and enigmatic in popular literature, chiefly because of the (non-Indo-European) language they spoke. Yet, in fact, Etruscan society is in some ways one of the most studied and best known in antiquity. Their great cities occupied the area of modern Tuscany and northern Lazio in Italy, where vast cemeteries are still visible. Etruscan society was highly literate in ancient terms, but no Etruscan literature survives. The views of Greek and Roman authors about the Etruscans were clearly influenced by their fascination for this ‘lost’ civilisation, and this literary evidence has to be carefully compared with the rich archaeological record. At their peak, the Etruscans were thought to have controlled much of Italy and the Western Mediterranean and to have been a formative influence on Rome. This course will examine the truth behind this image, and the gradual process by which these cities were conquered and brought under Roman domination.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 one-hour lectures; 2 seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One source criticism (50%); one 1-hour examination (50%) (Spring)
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Modules: HS2102 or HS3102.
Contact: Dr G Bradley (School of History and Archaeology)
 
HS3318 - THE LATER ROMAN EMPIRE AD284 - 602
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The history of the later Roman empire is marked by rapid and dramatic change: the revolution in the position of Christianity in the empire, from persecuted cult to state religion; the German 'invasions' of the fourth and fifth centuries, and the establishment of Germanic kingdoms within the territory of the Roman empire; the decline of Rome, but the emergence of vibrant new power centres, such as Constantinople; the splitting of the empire into two halves (East and West), and the collapse of the latter. The period has traditionally been characterised as 'the decline and fall of the Roman empire', but this module reflects and considers the more recent view that the period was one of transformation, witnessing the metamorphosis of the world of antiquity into the medieval world. As well as considering the political, social and cultural transformations of the period the module also devotes attention to the famous architects of these transformations, such as Constantine the Great, Attila the Hun, and Justinian I. The module draws on, and discusses the nature of, the rich source material for the period: classicising histories, church histories, chronicles, court panegyrics and polemics, letter collections, legislation, inscriptions, art, and archaeology.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Approximately 30 one-hour lectures; 6 seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One essay (35%); two class tests, (15%); one 2-hour examination (50%).
REQUISITES: Module HS3102 Introduction to Roman History.
Contact: Dr S Tougher (School of History and Archaeology).
 
 

ARCHAEOLOGY MODULES

HS2387 - AEGEAN BRONZE AGE: EMERGENCE TO COLLAPSE
Level 3 Module Double Semester 20 credits
This module addresses the palace of civilisation of Minion Crete and Mycenaean Greece (1600-1150) which were first revealed by the famous excavations of Schliemann and Evans and the decipherment of the linear B tablets. These civilisations continue to provoke critical assessment of the archaeological and documentary evidence to arrive at an understanding of the workings of the palace states and the causes of their downfall. In this module students assess the nature of the Minion and Mycenaean palace cultures in the Bronze Age. The formation of states and the emergence of 'civilisation' in the early and middle bronze age Aegean are key topics of the module. The module uses a detailed discussion of the relevant archaeological evidence as a case study of these general processes and the emergence of complex societies.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 20 one hour lectures, 2 one hour seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 essay (40%) and 1 examination (60%).
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Modules: HS2101 or HS2102.
Contact: Professor James Whitley, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2120 - ANCIENT EGYPT
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This free-standing module introduces students to ancient Egypt as its inhabitants saw it: as a landscape intimately bound up with the activities of the gods and over which a living god presided. The way in which writing was used to reinforce images of Egypt’s position in the world is demonstrated, as is the position of the temple and tomb within the society and landscape of Egypt. The Egyptian view of the afterlife, as being a still more perfect version of Egypt is also examined along with the central concept of ma’at, a concept difficult to translate but which centres on living correctly. The module provides the background to other courses on ancient Egypt offered by the Archaeology Section of HISAR.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Teaching will be through a series of lectures, supported by extensive images provided using PowerPoint. This will allow students to become familiar with terms derived from another language (ancient Egyptian) and built up over the history of Egyptology. Questions from students will be encouraged. Classroom work will be supported by individual essay tutorials, during which the topic will be discussed with the student as well as feedback given on writing style and referencing.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 hour examination (Autumn) (60%), 1 assessed essay (40%).
Contact: Dr Paul Nicholson, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2102 - ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE GREEK & ROMAN WORLD
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This course will provide an introduction to some of the more important aspects of the archaeology of the Greek and Roman World, including the archaeology of the ancient city and its buildings, religious monuments and sanctuaries, art, agriculture and rural life, and the Roman army.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 weekly 1 hour lectures, 2 x 1 hour seminars/tutorials.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 hour examination (Autumn) (60%), 1 assessed essay (40%).
Contact: Dr Peter Guest, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2389 - ART & ARCHAEOLOGY OF CLASSICAL GREECE
Level 3 Module Double Semester 20 credits
The archaeological, iconographic and artistic evidence is of fundamental importance for our understanding of the nature of the classical Greek polis. The module assesses critically the evidence for temple and civic architecture, burial practices, vase painting, fortification and the relation between the city and its countryside, with special reference to Athens and Attica.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 20 one hour lectures, 2 one hour seminars for which students would have to prepare in advance and a museum trip.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 essay (40%) and 1 examination (60%).
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Modules: HS2102.
Contact: Dr Ruth Westgate, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2103 - BRITISH PREHISTORY
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
An examination of the archaeology of Britain in the 5000 years preceding the Roman conquest of AD43. The course will focus on the agricultural societies of later prehistory. Issues discussed in detail include the importance of monuments in the Neolithic, the development of elaborately defended settlements in the Iron Age, the changing emphasis on death, the role of exchange on a local and national scale and the importance of regional differences in the settlement record.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 weekly 1 hour lectures, 2 x 1 hour seminars/tutorials.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 hour examination (Spring) (60%), 1 assessed essay (40%).
Contact: Mr Niall Sharples, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2307 - EARLY ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
The end of the Roman province of Britain and the creation of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms are two key features of this formative period of British history. The apparent sharpness of the transition from Roman to English worlds is a matter of intense modern debate. This module focuses on the archaeological and, to a lesser extent, historical evidence for the Anglo-Saxons in the period AD c.400-650.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 lectures; 1 seminar.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 essay (40%) and 1 examination (60%).
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Module: HS2104.
Contact: Professor John Hines, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2117 - GREAT DISCOVERIES IN ARCHAEOLOGY
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed as an introduction to the development of archaeology as a discipline. In showing the broad outlines of how the subject has developed up to and including the present, it aims to show students the key theoretical shifts through time, as well as introducing them to the key figures and key sites which have shaped the discipline.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 lectures, one seminar.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 60% written 1 hour examination and 40% coursework.
Contact: Dr Paul Nicholson, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2100 - HUMAN ORIGINS, COMPLEXITY AND CIVILISATION
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This course introduces students to world prehistory and to the fundamental questions of archaeological investigation, chiefly those that concern human biological, social and cultural evolution, the origins of sedentism and domestic economies, and the emergence of palace civilisations. Students study the relationship between humans and other primates, the timescale of human evolution, the emergence of ancient and modern humans, the development of sedentism, agriculture, and monumental architecture, the rise of palatial civilisations in the Mediterranean (including Greece and Egypt), and complex mobile communities of the Iron Age.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 weekly 1 hour lectures; 2 x 1 hour seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 hr examination (50%), an essay plan and essay portion (50%).
Contact: Professor Ian Freestone, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2322 - INTRODUCTION TO THE MUSEUM ENVIRONMENT
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This course provides an introduction to the factors such as light, incorrect relative humidity and pollutants which cause deterioration of museum objects. Students look at basic interactions of artefacts with their surroundings and methods of environmental monitoring and control. Assessment of the environment and development of methodology for collection care are discussed.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Ten lectures and five, three hour practical sessions which may include museum visits.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 essay (40%) and 1 examination (60%).
REQUISITES: Pre-requisites modules: HS2103
Contact: Ms Jane Henderson, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2306 - IRON AGE BRITAIN
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
The Iron Age sees the transformation of the archaeological record and the eventual emergence of Britain in the historical record. This double module is designed to provide students with a detailed understanding of the archaeology of the British Iron Age focusing particularly on the nature and causes of changes in the technology, settlements and monuments of the later first millennium BCE. It sets out the evidence for Britain as it begins to come into contact with the expanding Roman Empire.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 20 lectures; 2 seminars; field trip.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 essay (40%) and 1 examination (60%).
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Module: HS2103.
Contact: Mr Niall Sharples, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2305 - LATER BRONZE AGE BRITAIN
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
The Later Bronze Age in Britain marks a major transformation in the archaeological record. Patterns of ritual behaviour, burial, settlement and artefact use all begin to change. This single module explores these major transformations which see the establishment of settled life, agrarian landscapes and the consolidation of social differentiation, especially in southern Britain. These themes are investigated by individual case studies and related to the wider European context.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 lectures; 1 museum practical; optional field trip.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 essay (40%) and 1 examination (60%).
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Modules: HS2103.
Contact: Mr Niall Sharples, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2309 - MIDDLE AND LATER SAXON ENGLAND
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module covers the archaeological evidence for the development of Anglo-Saxon England AD 650-1050. This is one of the crucial periods in the development of England with the emergence of a few large kingdoms and then England's eventual unification. Major social and economic transformations in rural settlements, towns, and artefacts help to delineate the scale of these changes.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 hours of teaching, 1 seminar.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 essay (40%) and one examination (60%).
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Module: HS2104.
Contact: Professor John Hines, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2311 - NEOLITHIC EUROPE
Level 3 Module Double Semester 20 credits
The Neolithic marks the beginning of one of the most significant transformations in human behaviour with the shift from small and transient hunter-gatherer populations to the emergence of settled and growing populations. This single module introduces students to the wealth of evidence for the neolithic period in Europe. By means of selected case studies, it investigates both the initial spread and subsequent diverse development of Neolithic societies over a long time scale - the sort of study of human behaviour which is only possible through archaeology.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 20 lectures; seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 essay (50%) and 1 examination (50%).
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Module: HS2101.
Contact: Professor Alasdair Whittle, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2104 - POST ROMAN & MEDIEVAL BRITAIN
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
An introduction to the archaeology of Britain in the period 400 to 1500, covering the Anglo-Saxon settlement, the emergence of 'Celtic' and Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. The role of towns and nature of rural settlement up to the 11th century. The relevance of medieval documentary evidence and in particular Domesday Book. The Norman impact on England, castles, towns and rural settlement to 1500 AD.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 weekly 1 hour lectures, 2 x 1 hour seminars/tutorials.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 hour examination (Spring) (60%), 1 assessed essay (40%).
Contact: Professor John Hines, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2340 - POST-ROMAN CELTIC BRITAIN
Level 3 Module Double Semester 20 credits
As Roman Britain disintegrated and barbarian Germanic groups carved up the richest parts of the old province, independent Celtic kingdoms were created in the West and North of Britain and in Ireland. This course is designed to provide a better understanding of the archaeological evidence for the development of ‘Celtic Britain’ under Anglo-Saxon encroachment, the emergence of kingdoms throughout the ‘Celtic West’ and the emergence of Christianity.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Examination: 60% (2 Hours), Coursework 40%.
Contact: Dr Alan Lane, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2413 - THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF LATE ANTIQUITY
Level 3 Module Double Semester 20 credits
A thematic and regional introduction to the material culture of the Mediterranean world in the period of Late Antiquity (c. AD 300–800), examining the material remains within the context of the political and cultural changes associated with the disintegration of the Roman Empire and the development of the political and cultural groupings that were to endure into the Middle Ages.
METHODS OF TEACHING:20 Lectures and 2 seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 hour written examination (60%) (Spring) and coursework (40%).
Contact: Professor Denys Pringle, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS2350 - THE HISTORY OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL THOUGHT
Level 3 Module Double Semester 20 credits
The development of ideas about the past and the emergence of a substantial body of archaeological theory is of crucial importance to modern attempts to interpret the past. The module provides an introduction to the major developments in archaeological theory, practice and interpretation from the period of the first antiquarians to modern uses of structuralism, critical theory and post-modernism.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 20 one hour lectures, 2 one hour seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 essay (40%) and 1 examination (60%).
REQUISITES: Pre-requisite Modules: HS2101.
Contact: Professor Alasdair Whittle, School of History and Archaeology
 
 

CHEMISTRY MODULES

CH3113 - CHEMICAL BIOLOGY I: CELLS AND THE MOLECULES OF LIFE
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
All life obeys the fundamental laws of chemistry whether we are considering a single cell bacterium or an elephant. This module will reinforce this idea by linking together the principles of chemistry with real biological examples. Living organisms are constructed mainly from macromolecules such as proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, yet these awesome structures can be broken down into chemically simple building blocks, the chemistry of which can be easily understood. As well as looking at covalent structures, the importance of non-covalent interactions will be explained, leading to an understanding of how molecules interact in the maintenance of life. Lectures will be supplemented by workshops that will explore the action of foreign molecules such as drugs on biological systems.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 17 lectures, 5 workshops of 2 hr.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 20% workshop assignments, 80% 1 hr examination
REQUISITES: AS-level in Chemistry or an equivalent
Contact: Dr C P Morley, School of Chemistry
 
CH2115 - CHEMISTRY OF THE COSMOS
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
Modern theories of the origins of the Universe hold that it began with the ‘hot big bang’ about 1.8 x 1010 years ago. This module looks at theories of how the Universe began, how subsequently different classes of stars were formed and evolved and at the processes which gave rise to the chemical elements within stellar environments. In addition it examines the atmospheres of extra-terrestrial systems and methods of remote sensing. Lectures will be supplemented by workshops which will explore how the ideas of remote sensing can be applied to terrestrial problems such as weather and environmental monitoring. METHODS OF TEACHING: 17 Lectures, 5 Workshops of 2 hr. METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 20% Workshops, 80% 1 hr examination. REQUISITES: A-Level in Chemistry or an equivalent. Contact: Dr P R Davies, School of Chemistry
 
CH2118 - ENERGY RESOURCES AND MATERIALS
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is concerned with chemical aspects of the production and utilisation of energy. It includes discussion of a range of energy sources, and the materials required for their exploitation.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 17 lectures, 5 workshops of 2 hr.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 20% workshop assignments, 80% 1 hr examination
REQUISITES: AS-level in Chemistry or an equivalent
Contact: Dr C P Morley, School of Chemistry
 
CH2117 - ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module discusses the chemistry of the environment, including the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. Particular attention is devoted to the causes and effects of pollution in the environment, such as smog, acid rain, global warming, ozone depletion, water pollution, and the methods used for pollution control.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 17 lectures, 5 workshops of 2 hr.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 20% workshop assignments, 80% 1 hr examination
REQUISITES: AS-level in Chemistry or an equivalent
Contact: Dr C P Morley, School of Chemistry
 
CH2112 - FORENSIC CHEMISTRY
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module presents and discusses modern forensic chemistry. It introduces the concepts that are important to accurate forensic analysis and provides detailed information about how evidence is collected and subsequently assessed. The main topics to be covered include: drugs and poisons, serology and DNA, fibres, hairs and fingerprints, and the module will include a description of modern instrumental methods of analysis.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 17 Lectures, 5 Workshops of 2 hr.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 20% Workshop assignments, 80% 1 hr examination.
REQUISITES: A-Level in Chemistry or an equivalent
Contact: Dr P R Davies, School of Chemistry
 
 

CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING MODULES

CP0111 - INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
This module provides an introduction to the key debates within human geography, for example the key issues of space, place, and power, social and spatial relations. The key underlying foci is the relationship between man and his environment, from economic, political, social, environmental and cultural perspectives, primarily the spatial organisation of society and social organisation of space. These issues will be covered using contemporary case studies from global, national, regional and local levels. METHODS OF TEACHING: 10 x 3 hour lecturing slots, 30 hours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 100% Autumn examination. Contact: Professor John Lovering, School of City and Regional Planning
 
 

COMMUNICATION MODULES

PLEASE NOTE THAT LEARN ALSO OFFERS FREE-STANDING ENGLISH MODULES.
SE1287 - ACADEMIC WRITING IN ENGLISH 1
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module offers an opportunity to improve the quality of academic written work by raising awareness about conventions in academic writing at various levels. Lack of awareness and knowledge of correct referencing techniques, punctuation and grammatical control severely limit the standard of academic writing. The module will also include strategies for planning and organising written work.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and practical workshops. Self study and tutor feedback.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1½hr examination (Autumn) 50%. Coursework 50%.
CONDITIONS: Designed for non-native speakers.
Contact: Language and Communication Office, Humanities Building
 
SE1288 - ACADEMIC WRITING IN ENGLISH 2
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module offers an opportunity to further improve understanding of good practice in academic writing. Consideration will be given to the different functions of writing together with techniques for self-improvement and understanding of a variety of assessment criteria.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and practical workshops. Self-study and Tutor feedback.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1½ hour examination (Spring) 50% and coursework 50%.
CONDITIONS: Designed for non-native speakers.
Contact: Language and Communication Office, Humanities Building
 
SE1289 - ORAL SKILLS IN ACADEMIC CONTEXT 1
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
Effective speaking and listening skills are becoming a more important and more frequently assessed aspect of academic achievement. The ability to contribute and participate in seminars and tutorials is a skill not to be underestimated. Oral presentations have recently become a valid and more popular method of internal assessment. This module will improve both understanding and oral competence.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and practical workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 100% coursework.
CONDITIONS: Designed for non-native speakers.
Contact: Language and Communication Office, Humanities Building
 
SE1290 - ORAL SKILLS IN ACADEMIC CONTEXT 2
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module will extend understanding and appreciation of the importance of oral/aural skills within an academic environment. Practical sessions and useful feedback about different modes of presentation skills will increase both confidence and competence in these areas.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lecture presentations and practical workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 100% coursework.
CONDITIONS: Designed for non-native speakers.
Contact: Language and Communication Office, Humanities Building
 
 

EUROPEAN LANGUAGES FRENCH MODULES

PLEASE NOTE THAT LEARN ALSO OFFERS FREE-STANDING FRENCH MODULES.
EU1104 - CONTEMPORARY FRENCH LANGUAGE
Level 1 Module Double Semester 20 credits
This course enables students to build on the French language skills they have acquired at A-level. It provides an understanding of the main rules of French grammar and helps students to improve their comprehension and writing skills through a range of exercises including résumés, essays and reading comprehensions. The course also enables students to develop their oral and listening skills through weekly oral classes with native French speakers, through regular satellite classes and through audio-visual exercises in our new multi-media laboratories. The emphasis is on progressive language learning throughout the year, with a heavy emphasis on continuous assessment.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Three weekly seminars (two written tutorials and one oral class) over a 20 week period. Independent study is also strongly encouraged, and students are expected to attend weekly satellite classes and to complete computer-based exercises outside of normal class time.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Oral assessment 20% (all of which by continuous assessment). Written assessment 70% (30% continuous assessment for second semester work and exam at end of semester S (50%).
REQUISITES: Prerequisites are registration on undergraduate degree scheme at Cardiff University and 100 points of French at A2. Students with non-standard qualifications should discuss their eligibility for the module with the Head of French at the time of enrolment.
CONDITIONS:Students are normally expected to combine their study of Contemporary French language (EU1104) with two of the available non-language courses in French (EU1105-8). Entry on to this course may be subject to restrictions on numbers.
Contact: Dr Chris Bettinson (School of European Studies)
 
 

EUROPEAN LANGUAGES GERMAN MODULES

PLEASE NOTE THAT LEARN ALSO OFFERS FREE-STANDING GERMAN MODULES.
EU2138 - GERMAN HISTORY 1945-PRESENT
Level 1 Module Double Semester 10 credits
This module gives an overview of the major issues and developments in German history since 1945, which can serve as a base for all further studies of modern German history, culture and institutions.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures, seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One essay of 1,200 words.
 
 

EUROPEAN LANGUAGES ITALIAN MODULE

PLEASE NOTE THAT LEARN ALSO OFFERS FREE-STANDING ITALIAN MODULES.
EU3106 - INTRODUCTION TO ITALY POST 1945
Level 1 Module Double Semester 20 credits
The course will examine the development of postwar Italian society through a cultural and historical perspective. Particular consideration will be given to such themes as 'familism', the North-South divide, the economic miracle, governability, social unrest (terrorism, the Mafia, the students' revolts) and consumerism, all of which are central to the understanding of contemporary Italian society. The impact of significant cultural movements like 'Neo-realism' will be investigated through the critical analysis of literature and cinema.
 
 

EUROPEAN LANGUAGES LITERARY AND CULTURAL MODULES

EU1106 - MODERN FRANCE: WAR, REVOLUTION & CULTURE (I)
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
The foundations of France today were laid in the period 1789-1919. This course looks at the culture, society and history of France during this key period in France's past. Lectures will introduce you to the principal events that shaped France in this period, and will relate contemporary literature and culture to these events. Seminars will concentrate on a variety of contemporary documents, including cartoons, photographs, passages of literature, letters, and diary entries, to help you develop key analytical and reading skills. Throughout the course, you will be encouraged to relate contemporary documents to their context, and to find out as much as you can about this vital period in France's past.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Tuition is by lecture and seminar, totalling approximately 10 contact hours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One 1½-hour examination in the January assessment period.
REQUISITES: Standard requirement is registration on undergraduate degree scheme at Cardiff University and 80 points of French at A2 or 60 points of French at AS. Students with non-standard qualifications should discuss their eligibility for enrolment with the Head of French at the time of enrolment.
Contact: Dr Chris Bettinson (School of European Studies)
 
EU1107 - MODERN FRANCE: WAR, REVOLUTION & CULTURE (II)
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
Understanding the history and culture of France from 1939 to the 1990s is vital to understanding France in the twenty-first century. This course looks at the culture, society and history of France during this key period. Lectures will introduce you to the principal events that shaped France between 1939 and the 1990s, and will relate contemporary works of literature to these events. Seminars will concentrate on discussing the course texts in detail, to help you develop key analytical and reading skills. Throughout the course, you will be encouraged to relate the course texts to their context, and to find out as much as you can about this vital period in France's recent past.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Tuition is by lecture and seminar, totalling approximately 11 contact hours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One 1½-hour examination in the Spring assessment period.
REQUISITES: Standard requirement is registration on undergraduate degree scheme at Cardiff University and 80 points of French at A2 or 60 points of French at AS. Students with non-standard qualifications should discuss their eligibility for enrolment with the Head of French at the time of enrolment.
Contact: Dr Chris Bettinson (School of European Studies)
 
 

EUROPEAN LANGUAGES POLITICAL AND SOCIAL MODULES

EU1108 - INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH POLITICS
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module will introduce students to the main domestic political institutions and structures of modern France, and to the political role of France in the world during the post war era. The module will assume no prior knowledge of France or politics as a discipline, but will introduce relevant concepts as and when necessary to provide an understanding of modern French domestic politics and foreign policies. Through a series of eleven lectures, the focus will be upon the way in which France is governed at home and upon the move from colonial power to a country firmly integrated in the European Union.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Ten weekly lectures of 50 minutes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1500 word essay.
CONDITIONS: These modules (EU1105 and EU1108) can be taken as long as students have registered on an undergraduate degree scheme at Cardiff University and have achieved 80 points of French at A2 or 60 points of French at AS. Students with non-standard qualifications should discuss their eligibility for enrolment with the Head of French at the time of enrolment.
Contact: Dr Chris Bettinson (School of European Studies)
 
EU4110 - INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALISATION
Level 1 Module Double Semester 20 credits
This module will enable intelligent students to debate and provide reasonable answers to the following questions:""What is globalisation?"", ""What are the causes and trends promoting globalisation?"", ""How does globalisation impact on national identity and sovereignty, religion, inter-state relations, and international security?"" ""Is globalisation being 'driven' by particular countries or regimes in order to establish their international dominance (hedemony?)?"" ""Can globalisation be resisted or regulated, or is it a historically inevitable process to which citizens and governments must surrender?"".
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly lectures; fortnightly seminars
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: An essay worth 10% of the module assessments mark; a second worth 20%, and a final, unseen written exam worth 70%. The first two items are returned to provide summative feedback.
Contact: Dr. Steve Marsh
 
EU1105 - MODERN FRANCE: GEOGRAPHY, ECONOMY & SOCIETY
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module will introduce students to the spatial geography of France, its administrative organisation and changes in the country's demographic, economic and social structures since the end of the Second World War. It will assume no prior knowledge of France or of Geography, economics or sociology. Key concepts from these disciplines will be introduced as and when necessary for the understanding of modern France. Although delivered in ten self-contained lectures, the course is structured in such a way that students will be able to see how changes in one area impact upon other areas. This will enable students to build up a broad knowledge of the major developments in modern France over a period that has seen a deep transition from a rural economy and society to a modern post-industrial one.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 50-minute lecture (10 weeks).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1500 word essay.
CONDITIONS: These modules (EU1404 and EU1405) can be taken as long as students have registered on an undergraduate degree scheme at Cardiff University and have achieved 80 points of French at A2 or 60 points of French at AS. Students with non-standard qualifications should discuss their eligibility for enrolment with the Head of French at the time of enrolment.
Contact: Dr Chris Bettinson (School of European Studies)
 
 

HISTORY AND WELSH HISTORY MODULES

PLEASE NOTE THAT LEARN ALSO OFFERS FREE-STANDING HISTORY MODULES.
HS1713 - 'THE DEVIL'S BROOD' THE ANGEVIN KINGS OF ENGLAND 1154-1272
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
Upon Henry II’s accession in 1154, the English kingdom became part of a wider ‘Empire’ extending, at its fullest, from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. Until Henry III’s death in 1272 England’s importance varied in the minds of its rulers. This module will examine the relationship between king and kingdom, asking how royal rule changed after the pivotal events of 1204, when much of the dynasty’s continental power was lost, and 1215, when the barons of England imposed the celebrated charter of liberties, Magna Carta, upon their king. We will consider how the Angevins governed England, and the crises in which they were involved: the murder of Archbishop Thomas Becket; the excommunication of King John by Pope Innocent III; and the thirteenth-century baronial attempts to restrain royal power. Participants will be introduced to contemporary narratives, papal and royal letters, and official documents. We will explore the political, religious, and military history of the Angevin kings of England, and ask how they came to be known as ‘the devil’s brood’.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Paul Webster, School of History and Archaeology WebsterP@cardiff.ac.uk
 
HS1836 - BRITAIN & INTEGRATION OF EU 1940-1975
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This course examines the dilemma posed by west European unification for postwar British governments and analyses how the process of strategy formulation is influenced by domestic political and economic choices. These themes will be illustrated by exploration, first, of Britain’s triangular relationship with the Commonwealth, the USA and western Europe up to the 1975 referendum, secondly, of the dwindling benefits to be gained from close association with the Commonwealth, and thirdly, of the national economic strategies developed by the two main political parties during the period under review. A basic knowledge of and/or interest in economics is helpful for students taking this course.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Scott Newton, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1880 - BRITAIN AND EMPIRE: SUBJECTS, CITIZENS AND PATRIOTS 1688-1880
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
From the late 17th century an oligarchy based on the landed interest strove to preserve and extend its advantages in terms of wealth and status over the mass of the population. As trade and empire expanded in the 18th century, Britain went to war and imposed taxes to pay for it. Tensions thrown up by these developments gave rise to debates in which Britons were defined or defined themselves as either subjects subordinated to a ruling class, as citizens possessing shared rights and obligations or as patriots who took pride in their collective identity. This continuing process of negotiation between rulers and ruled is explored over the following key episodes in British and imperial history: The Nature and Significance of the Glorious Revolution of 1688; Patriotism and Radicalism in 18th century Britain; the American Revolution, 1763-83; National Identity and Citizenship in Ireland, 1760-1829; Chartism and Citizenship, 1838-48; Britain’s ruling class in the 19th century; Disraeli and imperialism; and British liberalism and India in the 19th century.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Patrick McGinn, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1885 - BRITAIN AT WAR, 1939-1945: THE HOME FRONT
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The module examines the impact of the Second World War on British politics, culture and society. It looks at the planning and organisation behind the British government’s efforts to mobilise its economic and social resources for war and its relative success in doing so. Consideration is given to the effects that these dramatic changes had on the population, on the development of morale and to the variety of factors that were responsible for sustaining or undermining it: the progress of the war; propaganda and war reportage; and the experiences of evacuation, air raids and rationing which came to form part of our national mythology. Throughout, the course questions the notion of ‘unity of sacrifice’, which came to dominate official discourse during the war years. It examines the many divisions and conflicts that existed within British society associated with issues such as class, race and gender and evaluates revisionist interpretations of the period which pose challenges to the traditional understanding of the Second World War as ‘The People’s War’. The course will also examine the ways in which the war encouraged a redefinition of the rights of the individual and the needs of the wider community and how this promoted a political consensus on the future needs of British society, including better housing, welfare provision and education, which culminated in a landslide Labour victory in 1945 and the establishment of the welfare state.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Gillian Clarke, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1780 - BRITISH EXPANSION OVERSEAS 1870-1945
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This course discusses British imperialism and examines Britain’s struggle to remain a hegemonic power during the era of great power rivalry and total war. It locates the mainsprings of British external policy in the internal configuration of the State, examines the political and economic motivations for the maintenance of Empire, providing case-studies of overseas expansion, and discusses Britain’s exchange of Pax Britannia for the 1940s special relationship.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Scott Newton, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1876 - BRITISH SOCIAL HISTORY, 1918 - 1951
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This module will examine a period of rapid social change in Britain in the first half of the twentieth century through exploration of a number of themes. As well as considering the nature and extent of change in the period, we shall attempt to establish the possibly more problematic elements of continuity. The aims of the module are to explore changes and continuities in British society in a period that spanned the aftermath of two world wars; to develop an awareness of past and current historiographical debates concerning both specific topics covered and the present condition of British social history, and to gain an appreciation of how interdisciplinary findings inform our understanding of British post-war social history. While not a primary objective of the module, consideration of these issues will increase students’ awareness of the more recent historical context of current developments in British society. The rich primary resources available on the period afford students great opportunities to hone their critical skills as historians, and can support a variety of interesting dissertation projects. Typical topics include: the place of class in an analysis of British social history; work – change, redundancy and renewal; health – the Welfare (and post-Welfare) State; the shifting role and status of women; practice and perceptions of crime and punishment; leisure, sport and entertainment; identity and the relationship between core and periphery – Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland; inward and outward migration; the imperial dimension and its consequences; the effects of government policies on education on British society and economy; changing patterns and novel forms of consumerism; the representation of the British in art, literature, film and music; environmental concerns and their place in British social history.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Ian Pincombe, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1841 - CRIME AND DISORDER: ENGLAND & WALES 1500-1750
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This course explores the nature, practice and perceptions of deviance, crime and punishment in early modern England and Wales. Activities such as treason, burglary, highway robbery, murder, infanticide, witchcraft, unlawful sexual practices, religious nonconformity, smuggling, and many other forms of 'unlawful' behaviour will be examined. We shall also consider the rationale and practice of the range of judicial punishments, which included hanging, burning at the stake, mutliation, whipping, shaming rituals, excommunication from the church, and money fines. Was early modern England and Wales as violent and malicious a society as some historians have supposed? What does a study of crime tell us about wider social mores? In order to answer these questions, we shall analyse in detail a range of primary sources - including ballads, trial pamphlets, witness testimony, legal treatises, legislation, social commentaries - in addition to recent historical writing.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Garthine Walker, School of History and Archalogy
 
HS1865 - CULTURE, SOC & I.D. IN WALES 1847-1914
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This course examines the growth of national awareness and the reformulation of notions of Welsh national identity during the years between 1847 and 1914 under the impact of profound economic, demographic, political, social and cultural changes. These themes will be illustrated by exploration, first, of the influence of nonconformity and the construct of the 'nonconformist nation', the ascendancy of the Liberal party, the ideology of the 'Gwerin', the defining of new notions of Welshness associated with some popular cultural forms like rugby and choral singing. Second, the course will explore the extent to which such developments were inclusive from a class and gender perspective, and third, challenges to traditional and newly-defined notions of Welshness posed by the rise of labour, the decline of the Welsh language, and certain aspects of popular culture.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Bill Jones, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1790 - DYNAMICS OF WITCHCRAFT 1450-1750
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The widespread belief in witchcraft and magic has been identified as a defining feature of the early modern period. In this course, we will consider the dynamics and historiography of supernatural phenomena in early modern Europe, through an exploration of four major areas of study. The first is the intellectual and cultural foundations of witch beliefs: the medieval inheritance; links with heresy and healing; the debate among demonologists; ideas about the Devil, the witches’ Sabbath, and flying. Secondly, we consider the structures that facilitated prosecutions: the role of secular and ecclesiastical authorities, the significance of the Inquisition and other legal systems, and tensions between neighbours at grass roots level. In the second semester, we focus on the power dynamics inherent in witchcraft trials and accusations. We will examine first the power dynamics at play in the relationship between the witch and her accusers: looking particularly at fantasies of power, love magic, and demonic possession. The third main area we explore is the relation between witchcraft and misogyny: the stereotype of the midwife-witch and the wise woman, cunning man, or lay healer, and the relationship between witchcraft prosecutions and misogyny.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Garthine Walker, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1106 - EARLY MODERN ENGLAND AND WALES 1500-1700
Level 1 Module Double Semester 20 credits
As Wales and England were united as a political unit at this time, a comparative perspective is essential to a study of the nature and scope of the Tudor and Stuart state and the lives of the people - both rich and poor - who lived within it. You will explore the differences and similarities between different social and cultural groups within both Wales and England as well as between national groups. Topics include the household, oral and print culture, music, magic and superstition, poverty, riot, crime, and political and religious radicalism, as well as events and processes concerning the Acts of Union, the Reformation, the civil wars, and republican rule. Larger themes run through these topics: the extent to which the early modern period experienced a transition from ‘tradition’ towards ‘modernity’; the extent to which a process of social and cultural polarisation occurred, separating the better-off from the poor; and the nature of political, cultural, linguistic, and ethnic relationships within the British Isles.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Modules will be taught through a mixture of lectures, with seminars, field trips and use of video film and documentary materials in certain modules.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: B grade at Advanced GCSE level.
Contact: Dr Garthine Walker, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1775 - EUROPE, EAST AND WEST 1945-1995
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The political, diplomatic, and socio-economic history of Europe from the end of the Second World War to the present. The course begins with the immediate post-war era, examining Allied governance of Germany and developments in Eastern Europe, which leads naturally to the Berlin crisis and the outbreak of the Cold War. The decision of the Adenauer government to anchor Germany firmly in the West and the creation of the European Economic Union complete the foundations of the postwar order in Europe. The term ends with an analysis of the changing stature in the era of decolonisation of Europe’s two remaining great powers, Britain and France, and the first crises within the Soviet Empire. The second term covers various challenges to the established post-war order, beginning with the authoritarian regime in Southern Europe, before examining the events and repercussions of the year 1968. It considers the attempts to lesson the impact of European division, leading up to the collapse of the Soviet Empire. The course concludes with the violent disintegration of Yugoslavia and its implications for today’s Europe.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Gerwin Strobl, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1848 - FASCISM AND ANTI-FASCISM IN FRANCE
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This course explores the multiple ways in which fascism and antifascism structured domestic and international politics: Themes include Fascism: What is fascism? Were the leagues of the 1930s fascist? Was the Vichy regime fascist? To what extent was fascism indigenous to France; to what extent was it a foreign import?; Antifascism: How did the parties of the French left (Communists, Socialists and Radical-Socialists) respond to the rise of fascism in both domestic and international politics? To what extent were these responses shaped by the French Republican tradition and by international circumstances; Intellectuals and commitment: In what ways did artists and intellectuals respond to the rise of fascism? Political commitment or ‘art for art's sake?’; Politics and Society: The relationship between the political struggles of the period and the class and gender structure of French society. Was France a ‘stalemate society?’ Does the concept of ‘modernisation’ help us to understand the history of France in this period?
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
CONDITIONS: The availability of this module is subject to confirmation.
Contact: Dr Kevin Passmore, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1740 - FRANCE 1870-1945: FROM THE COMMUNE TO THE OCCUPATION
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The Third Republic (1870-1940) was born from the collapse of the Second Empire, as German armies marched upon Paris. The new regime failed to evict the invader, and for years its republicanism made it a diplomatic pariah. Yet it survived longer than any other regime in modern French history. It it fought off challenges from monarchists, Catholics, Boulangists and nationalists on the right, and from socialists and communists on the left. It repelled a new German invasion in 1914-18, at the cost of 1.3 million dead. It established a secular democracy, and yet excluded women and millions of immigrant workers from the political process. In spite of these difficulties, only another German invasion in 1940 destroyed the regime. This course will provide a broad introduction to the major political, social, gender, military and cultural developments in this period. In the first semester we shall consider the general political developments; in the second we shall adopt a thematic approach, and conclude with an introduction to Vichy and the Occupation.
First semester topics include: The establishment of the Republic; the challenge from the right, 1870-1914; the challenge from the left, 1870-1914; the Great War; Socialism and communism, 1914-1940; Fascism in France, 1924-1940. Second semester topics include: the stalemate society; women and men, depopulation and the birthrate; immigration and national identity; intellectuals and politics; the Fall of France; Vichy and the Resistance.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
Contact: Dr Kevin Passmore, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1832 - GERMANY'S NEW ORDER IN EUROPE 1933-1945
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The module explores the political, diplomatic, military, and socio-economic history of the Third Reich. It covers the period both chronologically and thematically, and provides an introduction of the major historiographical interpretations of the Nazi dictatorship and its place in German and wider European history.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%). REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Gerwin Strobl, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1705 - HISTORY AND ICT: A GUIDED STUDY
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This module introduces students to, and provides them with, practical skills in aspects of ICT (Information and Computing Technology) and the use of ICT in historical research. Students’ own historical interests will be identified and possible project topics discussed. The project will be designed to be a useful piece of historical research that demonstrates some of the skills acquired on the course. At each stage, the skills acquired will be discussed in relation to the proposed project work. Meanwhile, students are introduced to key ways of using ICT in the presentation, interpretation and analysis of historical evidence and data. Students learn the basic principles behind the use of spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel 2003), databases (Microsoft Access 2003), web page creation (Macromedia DreamWeaver MX) and spatial analysis (Environmental Systems Research Institute ArcGIS 9.1) and gain very useful transferable skills in the use of applications pertinent to each. Skills in these areas are often demanded or seen as a considerable advantage in career development post-University.
METHODS OF TEACHING:: A mixture of lectures, practical skills workshops, and tutorials.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One project of 5,000 words. REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Steve Mills, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1734 - HOME & AWAY: WALES & THE WELSH 1914-1997
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
Between 1914 and 1997 Wales experienced a series of economic, political and social crises and changes. They include the effects of two world wars, the years of savage depression, the decline of the heavy industries and its social ramifications, the emergence and waning of a distinctive coalfield culture, and the decline and late-twentieth century stabilisation of the Welsh language. Social, economic and cultural change has been accompanied by political and governmental transformations, among them the establishing of Welsh national institutions and a Welsh political system, the emergence of the Labour party as the dominant political force and the more recent resurgence of nationalism. This module examines the nature, interaction and impact of these forces and changes, and seeks to increase understanding of them by studying them comparatively in relevant British and European contexts. It also investigates Welsh experiences outside Wales during the same period in order to integrate the transnational history of the Welsh in the twentieth century into studies of the homeland itself.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
Contact: Dr Bill Jones, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1765 - INDIA AND THE RAJ 1857-1947
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This course is designed to provide a critical introduction to the political, economic, social and cultural history of India from the assumption of direct rule by the Crown to independence. The module follows a broadly chronological framework along major themes which include - the consolidation of British rule after 1857; rebellion and resistance by Indians including subordinated groups; the emergence of the colonial economy; changes in the role and status of women; socio-religious and revivalist movements; the nationalist movement; the growth of communal identities and partition. The study of the Indian economy, politics and society will be useful for students planning an in-depth study of the sub-continent in their final year. No prior knowledge of the subject is assumed.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Padma Anagol, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1787 - INTO THE VORTEX: BRITAIN AND THE FIRST WORLD WAR
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This module explores Britain's role in the First World War, and examines the impact the war had on British society and culture. It takes a twin track approach, one exploring the military history of the war, the other examining this history through the study of a selected group of artists whose work both embodied the experience of war, and shaped British views of the war. It examines how these artists were involved in the war, how they viewed its progress, and how they responded to it in their work. The lectures and seminars focus on a group of selected authors, poets, artists, composers and the work they produced either during the war, or in the years after 1918, and have in many cases taken on an iconic role in twentieth-century Britain. The artists we focus on are not all from one school or style, but have been chosen to represent the traditional and the modern, and something of a cross section of British society in 1914; for example the poets Rupert Brooke and Hedd Wyn; the authors Vera Brittain, Siegfried Sassoon, and T.E. Lawrence; the painters Christopher Nevinson, Paul Nash and Stanley Spencer; and the composers Edward Elgar and Hubert Parry. In looking at the impact of the First World War on British society and culture, the module blends the military and social history of the period to examine how the British tried to come to terms with the war, how its progress was viewed, and how society responded to the war.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Toby Thacker, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1745 - MANAGING THE MIND: PSYCHIATRY, PSYCHOLOGY, AND BRITISH CULTURE, 1800-2000
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This module provides an introduction to transformations in the conceptualisation, treatment, and experience of mental illness in Britain over the past two centuries. Lectures provide a broad overview of key themes, including: the growth and decline of the asylum; gender and madness; madness in film, literature, and other forms of popular culture; psychiatry in war; psychoanalysis; nerves and modern life; psychopharmacology; and critiques of psychiatric power. Seminars provide the opportunity to discuss and debate these issues in more depth, and to develop skills in analysing different historiographical approaches and different types of source material. In both lectures and seminars, topics will be placed in the context of major historiographical debates relating to the work of Michel Foucault, Andrew Scull, Roy Porter, and Nikolas Rose. The emphasis throughout will be on uncovering the cultural resonances of madness, psychology and psychiatry over the period; changes in conceptualising mental health and illness; understanding the different perspectives on madness provided by different agents (for example psychiatrists, patients, novelists, and photographers); and analysing how ideas of mind are mediated through different modes of representation.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
Contact: Dr Tracey Loughran, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1101 - MEDIEVAL EUROPE
Level 1 Module Double Semester 20 credits
This module provides an introduction to the history of Europe during the Middle Ages. Topics include the Carolingian empire and its break-up; the emergence of France and Germany; the permeability of the frontiers of eastern Europe; the Byzantine world; the rise of Islam; changes in the environment during the period 500-1050; technology, communication and transportation; mental horizons; the towns and the professions; economic revolution 1000-1300; the investiture controversy; Benedictine Monasticism and Cluny in the eleventh century; the Cistercians; the renaissance of the twelfth-century; heresy and the Church's response; the Capetian kings of France; the English experience of monarchy; the Medieval papacy; the Hohenstaufen family and western Europe; the Italian city states; the first Crusade; the eastern Mediterranean; and medieval Spain.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Modules will be taught through a mixture of lectures, with seminars, field trips and use of video film and documentary materials in certain modules.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: B grade at Advanced GCSE level.
Contact: Professor Peter Edbury, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1716 - MEDIEVAL HISTORY
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The module will deal broadly with the field of medieval history. Details will be advertised over the summer.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: TBC, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1807 - MEDIEVAL HISTORY
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The module will deal broadly with the field of medieval history. Details will be advertised over the summer.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: TBC, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1744 - MODERN BRITISH/WELSH HISTORY
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The module will deal broadly with the field of modern British/Welsh history. Details will be advertised over the summer.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
Contact: TBC, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1868 - MODERN BRITISH/WELSH HISTORY
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The module will deal broadly with the field of modern British/Welsh history. Details will be advertised over the summer.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: TBC, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1752 - MODERN EUROPEAN/ASIAN HISTORY
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The module will deal broadly with the field of modern European/Asian history. Details will be advertised over the summer.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
Contact: TBC, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1838 - MODERN EUROPEAN/ASIAN HISTORY
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
The module will deal broadly with the field of modern European/Asian history. Details will be advertised over the summer.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: TBC, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1104 - MODERN WALES
Level 1 Module Double Semester 20 credits
This module confronts questions of national identity as they apply to modern Wales. Industrialisation, largely taking place in South Wales, fundamentally reordered Welsh society and economy. A considerable volume of internal migration was followed by substantial immigration, creating a new and contested linguistic and national identity. Wales acquired a reputation for political radicalism which has been nurtured well into the twentieth century. The Welsh experience has been interpreted through fiction, poetry and film. It is now available for consumption as part of the 'heritage industry'.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Modules will be taught through a mixture of lectures, with seminars, field trips and use of video film and documentary materials in certain modules.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: B grade at Advanced GCSE level.
Contact: Dr Bill Jones, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1835 - MUSIC, CITIZENSHIP AND THE NATION: GERMANY 1870 - 1990
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
For much of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, people in and outside Germany - the land of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven - assumed that Germans were the most musical people in the world. But what was 'Germany'? Who were 'the Germans'? What was 'German music'? And how have Germans reacted to music which is not obviously German, like jazz, blues, and rock? This module explores these questions by examining changing concepts of citizenship and nation in a turbulent period of German history, and by relating these understandings to different kinds of music. The module follows a conventional periodisation of modern German history, looking at the Wilhelmine Empire (1870-1918), the Weimar Republic (1919-1933), the 'Third Reich' (1933-1945), Germany under Allied occupation (1945-1949), or the period of de-Nazisificatio, and as a country divided between communist East Germany and West Germany between 1949 and 1990. The module considers classical music, dance music, jazz and rock to look at different notions and ideas of citizenship, and tries to relate these to the latest research on the place of music in modern Germany. It does not demand a prior technical knowledge of music.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Toby Thacker, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1842 - POLITICS, RELIGION AND IDENTITY: WALES 1558-1660
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This course will explore the role of Wales as a junior partner within the British state during the early modern period. Questions of nationality, ethnicity and identity will be examined when considering how the Welsh identified themselves closely with the English institutions of monarchy, church and the law while retaining a potent sense of national pride and uniqueness. We will also look at how the Welsh constructed their own self-image through myths and national histories, alongside the English view of their Celtic neighbours in sources such as the plays of Shakespeare and the speeches of Oliver Cromwell. The course will then go on to explore in some detail the period of the English Civil Wars and Interregnum, when interactions between Wales and the other constituent parts of the British Isles were particularly intense.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Lloyd Bowen, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1855 - RACE, SEX AND EMPIRE & INDIA, 1765-1929
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
In recent years historians have made important moves towards integrating the study of Empire within the broader political, cultural and social history of Britain and its ex-colonies. As a consequence, they have treated the study of Britain and India since the eighteenth- to the early half of the twentieth century as an integrated dialogue between the ‘metropole’ or home country and the ‘periphery’ or colony by applying the new categories of historical analyses: race and sex alongside gender and class. Students will engage in a critical and in-depth study of the history and politics of imperialism in this course. It will also provide multiple perspectives on the changing relationships between the coloniser and the colonised through several themes and topics which include: the nature and function of colonial knowledge of India; theories of Aryanism, race and masculinity in the legitimation of empire; regulation of sexual behaviour between the Raj and its subjects; the role of the memsahib in the making and unmaking of empire; missions, missionary activity and the nature of Indian conversions to Christianity; the myth of ‘global sisterhood’ examined through the forging of imperial or Victorian feminism; and the new citizens of empire namely the Asian Diaspora in Britain. Students will hone their historical skills by engaging with a wide variety of primary source materials drawn from social legislation such as the Contagious Diseases Act to key episodes such as the debates over Sati (widow burning), the Ilbert Bill and Child marriage controversies of the nineteenth century. Both Britons and Indians will figure in the historical analyses from soldiers and prostitutes to European housewives in India.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Padma Anagol, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1783 - RADICALISM, ANTI-CAPITALISM AND CHARTISM 1790-1850
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This module analyses the development of radical critiques of society, from Tom Paine’s Rights of Man through to the Chartists. The course is divided into chronological blocks. The first, ‘The birth of radicalism’, explores the place of Paine’s thought in relation to what went before: especially ideas and events occurring abroad, particularly in France, which were crucial to Paine’s innovations. It also examines the development of anti-capitalist thought in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The second part of the course considers ‘Radical responses to industrialisation’: responses that were a complex mixture of conservatism and innovation, including those of William Cobbett, due to his enormous popularity, and Robert Owen, due to his huge (ideological and organisational) impact. Block 3 analyses the period 1829-34, including developments such as co-operative societies, labour exchanges, the syndicalist movement, and the advent of democratic anti-capitalism. The final major Block is devoted to Chartism.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Ben Maw, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1742 - THE BRITISH CIVIL WARS AND REVOLUTION, C.1638-1649
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
In the mid-seventeenth century England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland were engulfed in a destructive and transformative civil war. This module examines this remarkable period in an innovative fashion by considering the British dimension of the conflict. This charts how developments in Scotland and Ireland as well as England and Wales are crucial to understanding the origins and progress of conflict. In addition to this multi-kingdom perspective, the module also pays particular attention to the cultural and social impact of war in England and Wales. It explores the newly-expanded world of print and propaganda in this ‘first age of journalism’, drawing on the explosion of news and propaganda which competed for readership in a much-expanded public sphere. It examines the impact of war on the literary culture of the period through authors like John Milton and Robert Herrick. It considers the radical political groups like the Levellers who argued that a more democratic society should rise from the ruins of Charles I’s kingdoms. The module deals with one of the most exciting and absorbing periods of British History when the fault lines between kingdoms and communities released forces which ultimately saw the king executed and a pan-British Republic established by the force of Oliver Cromwell’s New Model Army.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
Contact: Dr Lloyd Bowen, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1815 - THE CRUSADER KINGDOM OF JERUSALEM
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
In 1099 the army of the First Crusade conquered Jerusalem. The crusaders then proceeded to occupy a large part of what is now Israel, Lebanon and Syria until in 1187 Saladin conquered most, but not all, of their territory. The Third Crusade of 1188-92 won back some of this land and left behind a crusader presence in the East that lasted for a further century. This course examines the first hundred years of the history of the kingdom founded by the crusaders. A major theme inevitably centres on how the western settlers coped with almost constant conflict with their Muslim neighbours. This in turn raises questions such as how the economy worked, how far the kingdom was dependant on western Europe for support, and what sort of society developed under crusader rule. Underlying all these topics is the question of why people in western Europe thought the Holy Land was worth fighting for.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Professor Peter Edbury , School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1896 - THE DANGEROUS CITY? URBAN SOCIETY & CULTURE 1800-1914
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
During the nineteenth century, Britain became more extensively urbanized than ever before. In 1800, about one in four British people lived in cities; by 1900, three in four did so. Rather than this being a source of pride or optimism, contemporary observers feared that the city was becoming a ‘terra incognita’, a place of ‘dreadful delight’. Manchester was ‘Coke Town’, London the ‘modern Babylon’. At a physical level, urbanization compounded existing social problems of sanitation, disease, and housing and gave rise to new ones that contemporaries linked to crime, prostitution, and poverty. Cities were seen as sites of moral corruption and violence, the haunts of criminals, drug addicts, prostitutes, homosexuals and immigrants. More adventurous Victorians saw cities as places of excitement, however. Many took advantage of the growing leisure opportunities on offer. Others went ‘slumming’, exploring working-class districts, slums, and rookeries either in pursuit of excitement or to offer charity. This module explores the nature of urban living and the underside of the Victorian and Edwardian cities. Rather than sensationalizing the urban experience, it looks at how contemporaries viewed and interpreted the city. It examines the effect of rapid urbanisation on different institutions, groups and individuals as well as on ideas of class, gender, sexuality, race and welfare. It investigates those who lived, played, and worked in them, and how the social and physical problems they encountered were defined and tackled. In doing so, the module explores of number of issues, such as poverty and fears of the underclass, crime, leisure and pleasure, sex and prostitution, homosexuality, pollution and disease, race and fears of degeneration, and examines contemporary responses to them through the police, social purity movement, charity, controls on drink and entertainment, etc.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
Contact: Dr Keir Waddington, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1105 - THE MAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD, 1750-1970
Level 1 Module Double Semester 20 credits
Through a global perspective, the module aims to impart historical knowledge and understanding of the main political, economic, social and cultural factors that shaped the modern world. Individual themes such as rebellion, the rise of industrialism, nationalism and revolution are explored the context of several countries or regions of the world. This comparative approach will not only deepen your understanding of why things happened the way they did, but also highlight the interconnected nature of the development of societies and peoples in different locations. The geographical range - a distinctive feature of this module - encompasses many countries of Western and Eastern Europe as well as Asia.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Modules will be taught through a mixture of lectures, with seminars, field trips and use of video film and documentary materials in certain modules.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: B Grade at Advanced GCSE level.
 
HS1718 - THE NORMANS IN BRITAIN: SCOTLAND AND WALES, C.1050-1200
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This module examines the impact of the Normans on the history of medieval Wales and Scotland. Men from Normandy are recorded in both countries at least a decade before William the Conqueror’s arrival in England in 1066 and they and their fellow countrymen went on to have a considerable influence on the subsequent development of Wales and Scotland in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. In the first semester the module traces the history of the Normans in Scotland from the reign of Macbeth until the death of William I ‘the Lion’ in 1214. Prominent among the settlers, who arrived at the invitation of the Scots kings, were the ancestors of the great Scottish royal dynasties of Bruce, Balliol and Stewart. The second semester focuses on the Normans in Wales. Here the more fragmented political scene allowed the Normans to undertake piecemeal conquest, gradually displacing the native ruling dynasties of the principalities of eastern and southern Wales. As well as settlement, the module compares the Norman influence on the churches of Wales and Scotland and the growth of urban communities. Students taking this module will have the opportunity to study examples of primary source material in translation.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Bill Aird, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1812 - WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR 1035-1087
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This course will focus upon the career and achievements of William the Conqueror, who became duke of Normandy at the age of eight in 1035, and King of England, after his victory over Harold at the battle of Hastings on 14 October 1066. By tracing the Conqueror’s career, students will also examine the relationship between the Norman aristocracy and the ducal/royal house, a relationship that was often strained and sometimes violent. The course will also consider the impact of the Norman conquest and settlement on , political, ecclesiastical, social, cultural and economic structures, not only in the Anglo-Saxon kingdom, but also in the Welsh Marches and the Anglo-Scottish borderlands. This course will draw heavily upon the variety of primary source material that survives from this period, including historical narratives such as the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, and the writings of William of Poitiers, William of Jumièges and Orderic Vitalis. Students will also be introduced to other forms of literary and non-literary sources such as writs and charters, military and ecclesiastical monuments, and other visual representations of Norman history, including the Bayeux Tapestry, manuscript illumination and the seals of individuals and corporations.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Bill Aird, School of History and Archaeology
 
HS1893 - WOMEN, HEALTH AND MEDICINE IN BRITISH SOCIETY, 1870-1980
Level 3 Module Double Semester 30 credits
This course investigates women’s changing experiences of health and medicine in modern Britain. It examines women’s relations to medical power as patients, practitioners, and consumers; female experiences of health and illness; and the social and cultural construction of gendered medical knowledge. The first half of the course focuses on women’s institutional, professional and popular involvement with medicine until 1950, but also explores gendered experiences and representations of madness, venereal disease, and birth control. In the second semester, women’s experiences of health, illness and medicine ‘from cradle to grave’ are charted through a series of seminars focusing on important stages in the female life cycle – menstruation, pregnancy, childbirth, and old age. Important social and technological changes are also examined at various points, including the impact of the welfare state, the introduction of the contraceptive pill, the rise of second wave feminism, and changing demographic patterns. The course also makes use of case studies of illness and health-related issues to examine the complex set of processes concerned in the making of a diagnosis: the ‘medicalisation’ of ideas and experiences; the dynamic interplay of medical, scientific, and everyday or ‘folk’ wisdom; the shifting roles and relations of doctors, patients, and public; and the tensions between ‘subjective’ experience and ‘objective’ knowledge.
Topics covered include women in the medical profession; nursing; madness; ‘social purity’; health during the Depression; menstruation; pregnancy; childbirth; motherhood; self-help; and feminist critiques of medical power. Key themes explored throughout the course include the creation, dissemination, and reception of medical knowledge, and ideas of health and illness, in a range of arenas such as medical texts, advice literature, and women’s magazines; the interrelations of social, institutional, and technological change; the potentialities and problems of different kinds of evidence; the tension between private practices and public discourses; and the interaction between the histories of women, health, and medicine, and other social, cultural, and political histories of modern Britain.
METHODS OF TEACHING: A mixture of lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One assessed essay (25%) and one 3 hour examination (75%).
REQUISITES: HS1101 or HS1104 or HS1105 or HS1106.
Contact: Dr Tracey Loughran, School of History and Archaeology
 

 

LIFELONG LEARNING COMPUTING MODULES

CE3340 - C PROGRAMMING 1
Level 2 Module Year 20 credits
Topics covered include data types, arithmetic operators, use of conditional and iterative control statements, use of standard library functions, creation of user defined functions, accessing arrays using subscripts and pointers, use of C preprocessor directives, manipulation of data structures and an introduction to makefiles. Assessed work will include the writing of C programs.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly lectures with a laboratory session plus 1 day school (40 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) coursework ii) written class test.
Contact: Dr E H M Evans (Information Services, 40/41 Park Place)
 
 

LIFELONG LEARNING ENGLISH MODULES

PLEASE NOTE THAT ENGLISH LITERATURE, COMMUNICATION AND PHILOSOPHY ALSO OFFERS FREE-STANDING ENGLISH MODULES.
CE4297 - CLASSICAL MYTHS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course will explore the enduring appeal of Classical mythology in the English-speaking literary world. We will explore major motifs from Greek and Roman myths (such as Oedipus, Medea, Orpheus, Adonis, Pygmalion, etc) and their creative use in a wide range of texts in English literature from different periods (from Medieval to modern) and different genres (from poetry to fantasy and science fiction).
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour lectures/seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One 1500 word essay demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject.
Contact: Dr I Spring (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4311 - CLASSICAL MYTHS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 10 credits

METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour lectures/ seminars. METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One 2000 word essay demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject, and showing skills of evaluation and analysis.
Contact: Dr I Spring (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4441 - GOTHIC WORLDS: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE SUPERNATURAL IN FOLKLORE AND LITERATURE
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
Our fear of and fascination with tales of terror and the supernatural is ages old. This course will look at narratives and traditions from folklore, literature, art and archaeology that can be loosely be classed under ‘gothic’. Gothic characters, human and supernatural including vampires, ghosts and werewolves will be examined in a variety of forms employing material as diverse as medieval ‘visions’ and modern feature films and television programmes. This course is taught by Dr Juliette Wood who is an authority on folklore and tradition.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour lectures/ seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Written work based on class exercises and independent work demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject.
Contact: Dr Ian Spring (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4447 - GOTHIC WORLDS: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE SUPERNATURAL IN FOLKLORE AND LITERATURE
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour lectures/ seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Written work based on class exercises and independent work demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject, and showing skills of evaluation and analysis.
Contact: Dr Ian Spring (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3765 - MYTH, LANGUAGE AND IDEALOGY IN J.R.R. TOLKIEN'S FICTION
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One 2000 word essay demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject, and showing skills of evaluation and analysis.
Contact: Dr. I. Spring (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3379 - MYTH, LANGUAGE AND IDEOLOGY IN J.R.R. TOLKIEN'S FICTION
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course examines Tolkien’s mythology of Middle-earth, its sources in northern European mythologies and languages, as well as other aspects of his scholarly background such as anthropology and archaeology, and how he used them creatively in writing his fiction, notably in The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One 1500 word essay demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject.
Contact: Dr. I. Spring (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4416 - THE GREATEST WORKS OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course will examine some of the greatest and best-loved works of children's literature in English, from the Victorian period to today. Among other works we will consider Kenneth Grahame's The Wind in the Willows, Lewis Carroll's Alice books, L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Philippa Pearce's Tom's Midnight Garden and J.K. Rowlking's Harry Potter books.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour lectures/seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One 1500 word essay demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject.
Contact: Dr Dimitra Fimi (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4417 - THE GREATEST WORKS OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour lectures/seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One 2000 word essay demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject, and showing skills of evaluation and analysis.
Contact: Dr Dimitra Fimi (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
 

LIFELONG LEARNING HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY MODULES

PLEASE NOTE THAT HISTORY AND WELSH HISTORY ALSO OFFERS FREE-STANDING HISTORY MODULES.
CE4395 - ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL COINAGE IN BRITAIN
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
The aim of this course is to provide the student with an introduction to the history and development of coinage in Britain from the first Celtic coins in the 2nd century BC to the medieval sterling pennies, thus covering a period of over 1500 years – and including Roman and Anglo-Saxon coinage.
METHOD OF TEACHING: Weekly 2 hour Sessions including lectures, practicals & seminars
METHOD OF ASSESSMENT: One 1500 word assignment.
Contact: Dr David Wyatt (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning).
 
CE3975 - IDENTITY & THE BODY IN ENGLAND, 1500-1700
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
The contentious issue of ethnic and religious difference are not confined to contemporary society. This course will explore the role of physical appearance, gender, behaviour, dress, health and sickness in constructing various types of identity in Early Modern England and will examine how ideas about the body and identity have changed over time.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2 hour sessions including lectures & seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One 1500 word essay.
Contact: Dr David Wyatt (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4224 - INTO THE ABYSS - THE RISE OF EUROPEAN FASCISM, 1918-1939
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
Fascism represented the most serious threat to democratic governance in inter-war Europe and was a truly pan-European phenomenon. But why did European societies experience such a pronounced shift to the extreme right in this period? Taking a comparative approach this module will provide a general introduction to the rise of European fascism.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2 hour sessions including lectures & seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One 1500 word essay.
Contact: Dr David Wyatt (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4225 - LIFE IN THE TOWNS OF SOUTH WALES C. 1840-1900
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course examines the process of urbanisation in south Wales in the nineteenth century. It will consider how and why the towns of the region grew, and what life was like for the people that lived in them including topics such as housing, poverty, health, crime, education and leisure.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2 hour sessions including lectures & seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One 1500 word essay.
Contact: Dr David Wyatt (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4392 - SICILY AND MAGNA GRAECIA: THE GREEKS IN SOUTHERN ITALY, 490-212 BC
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course shifts the focus away from Greece and Rome to highlight and explore the history and the legacy of the ancient Greeks in the west. Using literary, historical and archaeological evidence for the Greek city-states of southern Italy it will explore the interaction of cultures – Greek, Italic, Punic, Sikel - in the western Mediterranean at a crucial time in world history
METHOD OF TEACHING: Weekly 2 hour sessions including lectures & seminars
METHOD OF ASSESSMENT: One 1500 word Essay.
Contact: Dr David Wyatt (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning).
 
 

LIFELONG LEARNING LANGUAGE MODULES (EUROPEAN)

CE1091 - FRENCH LANGUAGE A
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students with no knowledge of the French language who wish to acquire the basics of the language for social, survival or study purposes. The primary focus will be upon the skills of speaking and listening, but some attention will be given to reading skills.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Oral end test 30%/Continuous Assessment 10%. iii) Aural end test 40%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1092 - FRENCH LANGUAGE B
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students with a little knowledge of French: perhaps one year at school or module CE1091 French Language A. The primary focus will be upon the skills required for oral communication in social, survival and study situations. Some attention will be given to reading skills and basic writing skills will be introduced.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Oral end test 30%/Continuous Assessment 10%. iii) Aural end test 40%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1093 - FRENCH LANGUAGE C
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students who have completed a course of study leading to ""O""/GCSE level or equivalent or who have completed French A and B (modules CE1091 and CE1092). A period of revision of basic language skills and knowledge will be followed by training in the skills of speaking, listening and reading.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops ii) Self study including use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Reading comprehension 20% iii) Oral end test 30% iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1094 - FRENCH LANGUAGE D
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students who have completed an ""O""/GCSE level in French, or equivalent and who have maintained their language skills either by a stay in a French-speaking country or by a course of study. The focus of this module is upon the applied use of the language in work or study. The course provides an introduction to the language of business in French.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Reading comprehension 20% iii) Oral end test 30% iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1095 - FRENCH LANGUAGE E
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This post ""A"" level module offers a balanced syllabus of grammar and essential communication skills (spoken and written) for everyday use of French language. The emphasis is on reinforcing main grammar points studied previously and extending vocabulary. The course is entirely conducted in French and is supported with authentic materials (digital French TV channels and on-line newspapers). Open to students having completed French D (CE1094) or equivalent.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Reading comprehension 20% iii) Oral skills: meeting (simulation) /interview 30% iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1096 - FRENCH LANGUAGE F
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This post ""A"" level module offers a balanced syllabus of grammar and essential communication skills (spoken and written) for everyday use of French language. It further develops student’s language skills in the context of current affairs in the French speaking world.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities of LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Reading comprehension 20%. iii) Oral skills: meeting/interview 30%. iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2044 - FRENCH LANGUAGE G
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for post ""A"" level students or equivalent or who have completed French E and F (modules CE1095 and CE1096). Students will develop their business language skills and the course will serve as a preparation module for the internationally recognised exam Le Diplôme de Français des Affaires 1er degré from the Paris Chamber of Commerce and industry.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops ii) Self study including use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Written test 40%, iii) Oral assessment 20%. iv) Aural test 20%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2045 - FRENCH LANGUAGE H
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is aimed at students who have a good working knowledge of French, who wish to further improve their knowledge of French business language to a very high standard. The module will be the final stage of the preparation for Le Diplôme de Français des Affaires 1er degré from the Paris Chamber of Commerce and industry.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops ii) Self study including use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Written test 40%, iii) Oral assessment 20%. iv) Aural test 20%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2091 - GERMAN LANGUAGE A
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students with no knowledge of the German language who wish to acquire the basics of the language for social, survival or study purposes. The primary focus will be upon the skills of speaking and listening, but some attention will be given to reading skills.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Oral end test 30%/Continuous Assessment 10%. iii) Aural end test 40%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2092 - GERMAN LANGUAGE B
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students with a little knowledge of German: perhaps one year at a school or module CE2091 German Language A. The primary focus will be upon the skills required for oral communication in social, survival and study situations. Some attention will be given to reading and basic writing skills will be introduced.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Oral end test 30%/Continuous Assessment 10%. iii) Aural end test 40%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2093 - GERMAN LANGUAGE C
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students who have completed a course of study leading to ""O""/GCSE level or equivalent or who have completed German A and B (modules CE2091 and CE2092). A period of revision of basic language skills and knowledge will be followed by training in the skills of speaking, listening and reading.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Reading comprehension 20%. iii) Oral end test 30%. iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2094 - GERMAN LANGUAGE D
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students who have completed an ""O""/GCSE level in German, or equivalent and who have maintained their language skills either by a stay in a German-speaking country or by a course of study. The focus of this module is upon the applied use of the language in work or study.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Reading comprehension 20%. iii) Oral end test 30%. iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2095 - GERMAN LANGUAGE E
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for post A level students or students who, although they may not have completed an ""A"" level (or equivalent) have nevertheless maintained their language skills by an extended stay in a German-speaking country or by courses of study. The module further develops the language for work and study skills of German Language D (CE2094) or equivalent.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Reading comprehension 20% iii) Oral skills: meeting (simulation)/interview 30%. iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2096 - GERMAN LANGUAGE F
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This is a post ""A"" level module for students who intend to use German for the purposes of work or further study. In addition to developing these skills the student will develop a familiarity with current affairs in the German-speaking world via up-to-date broadcast and written materials.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities of LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Reading comprehension 20%. iii) Oral skills: meeting/interview 30%. iv) Aural comprehension 30%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2041 - GERMAN LANGUAGE G
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for post ""A"" level students or equivalent or who have completed German E and F (modules CE2095 and CE2096). Students will further develop their business language skills and the course will serve as a preparation module for the internationally recognised exam Das Zertifikat Deutsch für den Beruf.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops ii) Self study including use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Written test 40%, iii) Oral assessment 20%, iv) Aural test 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2042 - GERMAN LANGUAGE H
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is aimed at students who have a good working knowledge of German, who wish to further improve their knowledge of German business language to a very high standard. The module will be the final stage of preparation for the Zertifikat Deutsch für den Beruf.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops ii) Self study including use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Written test 40%, iii) Oral assessment 20%. iv) Aural test 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1678 - GREEK FOR BEGINNERS I
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This course aims to introduce students who have no knowledge of Greek to basic communication skills. The emphasis will be on spoken Greek, but some written skills will be taught.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Aural test 40%, ii) Oral class participation 40%, iii) Coursework 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1679 - GREEK FOR BEGINNERS II
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course aims to introduce students who have a basic knowledge of Greek or who have completed Greek for Beginners I, to simple communication skills. Speaking, listening, reading and writing skills will be taught.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Aural test 40%, ii) Oral class participation 40%, iii) Coursework 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2216 - GREEK FOR IMPROVERS I
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This course is aimed at students who have completed a Greek for Beginners course or equivalent. Students will further practise and improve their oral, aural, reading and written language skills.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Oral class participation 40%, ii) Coursework 20%, iii) Class test 20%, iv) Aural test 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2217 - GREEK FOR IMPROVERS II
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course is aimed at students who have some knowledge of the Greek language who wish to further improve their language skills to an intermediate standard and at the same time learn more about life and culture in Greece.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Oral class participation 40%, ii) Coursework 20%, iii) Class test 20%, iv) Aural test 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3091 - ITALIAN LANGUAGE A
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students with no knowledge of the Italian language who wish to acquire the basics of the language for social, survival or study purposes. The primary focus will be upon the skills of speaking and listening, but some attention will be given to reading skills.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Oral end test 30%/continuous assessment 10%. iii) Aural end test 40%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3092 - ITALIAN LANGUAGE B
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students with a little knowledge of Italian: perhaps one year at school or module CE3091 Italian language A. The primary focus will be upon the skills required for oral communication in social, survival and study situations. Some attention will be given to reading skills and basic writing skills will be introduced.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20% ii) Oral end test 30%/continuous assessment 10%. iii) Aural end test 40%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3093 - ITALIAN LANGUAGE C
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students who have completed a course of study leading to ""O""/GCSE level or equivalent or who have completed Italian A and B (modules CE3091 & CE3092). A period of revision of basic language skills and knowledge will be followed by training in the skills of speaking, listening and reading.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20% ii) Reading comprehension 20%. iii) Oral end test 30%. iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3094 - ITALIAN LANGUAGE D
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students who have completed an ""O""/GCSE level course in Italian, or equivalent and who have maintained their language skills either by a stay in Italy or by a course of study. The focus of this module is upon the applied use of the language in work or study. The course provides an introduction to the language of business in Italian.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%, ii) Reading comprehension 20%, iii) Oral end test 30%, iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3095 - ITALIAN LANGUAGE E
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for post A level students or students who, although they may not have completed an ""A"" level (or equivalent) have nevertheless maintained their language skills by an extended stay in Italy or by courses of study. The module further develops the language for work and study skills of Italian Language D.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at the LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%, ii) Reading comprehension 20%, iii) Oral skills: meeting (simulation)/interview 30%, iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3096 - ITALIAN LANGUAGE F
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This is a post ""A"" Level module for students who intend to use Italian for the purposes of work or further study. In addition to developing these skills the student will develop a familiarity with current affairs in Italy via up-to-date broadcast and written materials.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities of LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Reading comprehension 20%. iii) Oral skills: meeting/interview 30%. iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2212 - PORTUGUESE FOR BEGINNERS A
Level 1 Module Year 20 credits
This course is aimed at students with no previous knowledge of the language. Students will learn to understand basic written and spoken texts, taking part in simple conversation and conveying simple information in writing.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 40%, ii) End of class test 20%, iii) Aural class test 20%, iv) Oral class participation 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2213 - PORTUGUESE FOR IMPROVERS B
Level 1 Module Year 20 credits
This course is aimed at students who have studied Portuguese for one year part-time or equivalent. Students will further improve their communication skills at a level which is sufficient to cope with simple practical needs.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 40%, ii) End of class test 20%, iii) Aural class test 20%, iv) Oral class participation 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3050 - RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS I
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This course aims to introduce students who have no knowledge of Russian to basic communication skills. The emphasis will be on spoken Russian, but some written skills will be taught.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Aural class test 40%, ii) Oral class participation 40%, iii) Coursework 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3051 - RUSSIAN FOR BEGINNERS II
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course aims to introduce students who have a basic knowledge of Russian or who have completed Russian for Beginners I, to simple communication skills. Speaking, listening, reading and writing skills will be taught.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Aural class test 40%, ii) Oral class participation 40%, iii) Coursework 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3277 - RUSSIAN FOR IMPROVERS I
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This course is aimed at students who have completed a Russian for Beginners course or equivalent. Students will further practise and improve their oral, aural, reading and written language skills.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) written end of class test 20% ii) coursework 20% iii) oral class participation 40% iv) Aural test 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3278 - RUSSIAN FOR IMPROVERS II
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course is aimed at students who have some knowledge of Russian, or who have completed Russian for Improvers I.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) written end of class test 20% ii) coursework 20% iii) oral class participation 40% iv) Aural test 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4091 - SPANISH LANGUAGE A
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students with no knowledge of the Spanish language who wish to acquire the basics of the language for social, survival or study purposes. The primary focus will be upon the skills of speaking and listening, but some attention will be given to reading skills.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%, ii) Oral end test 30%/continuous assessment 10%, iii) Aural end test 40%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4092 - SPANISH LANGUAGE B
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students with a little knowledge of Spanish: perhaps one year at school or module CE4091 Spanish Language A. The primary focus will be upon the skills required for oral communication in social, survival and study situations. Some attention will be given to reading skills and basic writing skills will be introduced.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%, ii) Oral end test 30%/continuous assessment 10%, iii) Aural end test 40%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4093 - SPANISH LANGUAGE C
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students who have completed a course of study leading to ""O""/GCSE level or equivalent or who have completed Spanish A and B (modules CE4091 & CE4092). A period of revision of basic language skills and knowledge will be followed by training in the skills of speaking, listening and reading.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%, ii) Reading comprehension 20%, iii) Oral end test 30%, iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4094 - SPANISH LANGUAGE D
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for students who have completed an ""O""/GCSE level course in Spanish, or equivalent and who have maintained their language skills either by a stay in a Spanish-speaking country or by a course of study. The focus of this module is upon the applied use of the language in work or study. The course provides an introduction to the language of business in Spanish.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%, ii) Reading comprehension 20%, iii) Oral end test 30%, iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4095 - SPANISH LANGUAGE E
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for post A level students or students who, although they may not have completed an ""A"" level (or equivalent) have nevertheless maintained their language skills by an extended stay in a Spanish-speaking country or by courses of study. The module further develops the language for work and study skills of Spanish Language D.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops. ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%, ii) Reading comprehension 20%, iii) Oral skills: meeting (simulation)/interview 30%, iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4096 - SPANISH LANGUAGE F
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This is a post ""A"" Level module for students who intend to use Spanish for the purposes of work or further study. In addition to developing these skills the student will develop a familiarity with current affairs in the Spanish-speaking world via up-to-date broadcast and written materials.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops ii) Self study including the use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities of LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%. ii) Reading comprehension 20%. iii) Oral skills: meeting/interview 30%. iv) Aural end test 30%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2221 - SPANISH LANGUAGE G
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for post ""A"" level students or equivalent or who have completed Spanish E and F (modules CE4095 and CE4096). Students will further develop their language skills by discussing and analysing the current affairs of Spanish speaking countries.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops ii) Self study including use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%, ii) Written test 40%, iii) Oral assessment 20% iv) Aural test 20%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2222 - SPANISH LANGUAGE H
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is aimed at students who have a good working knowledge of Spanish, who wish to further improve their knowledge of the language to a very high standard. The course will cover various aspects of business, politics and society in the Spanish speaking world.
METHODS OF TEACHING: i) Weekly two-hour workshops ii) Self study including use of the audio laboratory and Computer Assisted Language Learning facilities at LEARN.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%, ii) Written test 40%, iii) Oral assessment 20% iv) Aural test 20%.
Contact: Ms Catherine Chabert (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
 

LIFELONG LEARNING LANGUAGE MODULES (NON-EUROPEAN)

CE2005 - ARABIC LANGUAGE I
Level 1 Module Year 20 credits
This course is aimed at students who have no previous knowledge of Arabic. The emphasis will be on developing a basic knowledge of the key language skills - reading, writing, speaking and listening.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Language workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Written test 40%, ii) Aural class test 20%, iv) Oral class participation 40%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2006 - ARABIC LANGUAGE II
Level 1 Module Year 20 credits
This course is aimed at students who have some knowledge of Arabic or who have completed Arabic I. Students will further practice their speaking and listening skills as well as being introduced to reading and writing skills.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Language workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) end of class test 20%, ii) coursework 20%, iii) aural class test 20%, iv) oral class participation 40%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2500 - ARABIC LANGUAGE III
Level 1 Module Year 20 credits
This course is aimed at students who have a good knowledge of Arabic (equivalent to two years of part-time study), who are interested in progressing further.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) end of class test 20%, ii) coursework 20%, iii) aural class test 20%, iv) oral class participation 40%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1001 - CHINESE LANGUAGE I
Level 1 Module Year 20 credits
This course is aimed at students who have no previous knowledge of Chinese. The emphasis will be on developing a basic knowledge of the key language skills - reading, writing, speaking and listening.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Language workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Written test 40%, ii) Oral continuous assessment 40%, iii) aural class test 20%.
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1002 - CHINESE LANGUAGE II
Level 1 Module Year 20 credits
This course is aimed at students who have a basic knowledge of Chinese or who have completed Chinese I (module CE1001). Students will learn to use a broader, but limited range of written, oral and aural language skills for practical needs.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Language workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) end of class test 20%, ii) coursework 20%, iii) aural class test 20%, iv) oral class participation (40%).
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2000 - CHINESE LANGUAGE III
Level 1 Module Year 20 credits
This course is aimed at students who have some knowledge of Chinese, or who have completed Chinese II. Students will further improve their speaking, listening, writing and reading skills and at the same time gain an insight into Chinese social and political life.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Language work-shops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Coursework 20%, ii) Written class test 20%, iii) Oral continuous assessment 40% iv) Aural test (20%).
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3537 - INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE
Level 1 Module Year 20 credits
This course is aimed at students who have studied Japanese for over 2 years part- time, who wish to further progress their active and passive language skills.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) class test (40%) ii) coursework (20%) iii) oral continuous assessment (40%)
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1074 - JAPANESE FOR BEGINNERS I
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
An introductory course which will give students an impression of the outlook and day-to-day life of modern Japan. No previous knowledge of the language is required.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Written class test (20%), ii) Coursework (20%), iii) Oral class participation (40%), iv) Aural test (20%).
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1377 - JAPANESE FOR BEGINNERS II
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course covers Hiragana to enable students to read Japanese. A wider range of grammatical structures and expression will also be taught.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) Written class test (20%), ii) Coursework (20%), iii) Oral class participation (40%), iv) Aural test (20%).
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2946 - JAPANESE FOR IMPROVERS I
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This course is aimed at students who have studied Japanese for 1 year part-time. Students will improve their reading, writing and speaking skills as well as gaining a further insight into the traditions and society of modern Japan.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) class test (40%) (ii) coursework (20%) iii) oral assessment (40%).
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2947 - JAPANESE FOR IMPROVERS II
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
In this follow on course from Japanese for Improvers I, students will learn to use a broader, but still limited range of oral, aural and written language skills, sufficient for practical needs.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly two-hour workshops.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: i) class test (40%) (ii) coursework (20%) iii) oral assessment (40%).
Contact: Ms Helga Eckart (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
 

LIFELONG LEARNING LAW AND BUSINESS MODULES

CE1784 - CRIMINAL LAW
Level 1 Module Year 20 credits
This course provides an overview of the field of criminal law and the offences that are dealt with in both Magistrates' and Crown Courts. The topics of rape, assault, motoring offences, theft, public order offences and drug-related offences comprise some of the many subject areas discussed. Running alongside each seminar will be coverage and analytic discussion of the critically acclaimed USA fiction legal series 'Murder 1', which provides a contemporary and stimulating approach to this profoundly interesting area of law. This module assumes no previous knowledge of criminal law. Following successful completion of this module, a number of students have entered the legal profession or commenced further studies in law.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures and group work (42 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test (open book) and assignment demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2680 - CRIMINAL LAW
Level 2 Module Year 20 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures and group work (42 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test (open book/multiple choice), and assignment demonstrating skills of evaluation and analysis.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2681 - CRIMINAL LAW
Level 3 Module Year 20 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures and group work (42 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test (open book/multiple choice) and assignment demonstrating skills of evaluation and analysis, plus a research project.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3187 - EMPLOYMENT LAW
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This course considers the relationship between employer and employee, and the status of each. Starting with contract of employment, payment and continuity, it covers rights, discrimination, termination of contract, health and safety, trade unions, European law and its effect on employment law in England and Wales, and the relevance of human rights legislation on employment law in England and Wales.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (22 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test, and assignment demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3188 - EMPLOYMENT LAW
Level 2 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (22 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test (open book/multiple choice), and assignment demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject, and showing skills of evaluation and analysis.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3189 - EMPLOYMENT LAW
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (22 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test (open book/multiple choice), and assignment demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject, and showing skills of evaluation, analysis and research.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1101 - EUROPEAN LAW
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module provides students with a knowledge of the basic principles of European law and places these in a social and economic context wherever possible. It should enable students to make a critical assessment of the law of Europe and the way it works in practice. Relevant directives, regulations and case law of the European Court of Justice will be examined. Where possible relevant comparative material from the USA and other common law countries, as well as the theoretical framework of European law and the justifications for the legal regulation of the areas involved, will be considered.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1½-hour class test and written work of 1,000 words showing knowledge and understanding of the subject.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2767 - EUROPEAN LAW
Level 2 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1½-hour class test and problem case-study in the form of a 2,000-word essay demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject, plus analytical ability.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2768 - EUROPEAN LAW
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1½-hour class test demonstrating ability at applying knowledge gained, and problem/case-study showing application, analysis and evaluation in the wider context.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4412 - INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
The module aims to introduce students to the legal rules and principles of International Environmental Law regarding the protection of the global environment. The module will examine the key developments in international environmental law and introduce students to the mechanisms and methods used to achieve international environmental compliance.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2 hour lectures (20 contact hours)
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Researched legal opinion to a problem question (1,500) words plus class test demonstrating knowledge and understanding of subject.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4413 - INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2 hour lectures (20 contact hours)
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Researched legal opinion to a problem question (1,500) words plus class test demonstrating knowledge and understanding of subject. The researched legal opinion will require students to undertake independent legal research and provide a coherent analysis of legal issues.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4414 - INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2 hour lectures (20 contact hours)
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Researched legal opinion to a problem question (1,500) words plus class test demonstrating knowledge and understanding of subject. The researched legal opinion will require students to undertake independent legal research and provide a coherent analysis of legal issues.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4260 - INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course introduces students to the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), the Marrakesh Agreement setting up the World Trade Organisation (WTO), the new General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) and other key WTO rules. It considers the broad debate on the relationship between international trade and human rights. Case studies: World Trade Rules on Intellectual Property (e.g. the TRIPS agreement) and the Right to Health; Agricultural Trade through the WTO System and its Impact on the Right to Food; Multinatioanl Corporations (MNCs) and Human Rights.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test and written assignment demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4261 - INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours)
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test and written assignment demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject, and showing skills of evaluation and analysis.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4262 - INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test and written assignment demonstrating understanding and knowledge of the subject, and showing skills of evaluation, analysis and research.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1361 - MANAGING FINANCE I
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
Managers and employers at all levels need to be competent at financial management. This course is designed to help students understand the essential aspects of finance management.
Method of teaching - weekly 2 hour lectures (20 contact hours)
Method of assessment - continuous assessment - 3 accounting assignments
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2861 - MANAGING FINANCE II
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
The course provides a further study of financial statements, planning and control, and other financial management techniques.
Method of teaching - weekly 2 hour lectures (20 contact hours)
Method of assessment - continuous assessment - 3 accounting assignments
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3184 - MEDIATION SKILLS
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This practical course explores the process of mediation as a highly effective dispute resolution procedure. Mediation is an excellent way of achieving a ""Win/Win"" outcome for all, with an overriding emphasis upon looking to the future whilst simultaneously encouraging the release of negative feelings. Through interactive role play and case studies, students should at the conclusion of the course be better equipped to deal with conflict of all types, whether in the workplace or in domestic situations. The module additionally concentrates upon the employment of negotiation and compromise strategies in dealing with a variety of stressful and problematic scenarios.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test, and assignment demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3185 - MEDIATION SKILLS
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test (open book/multiple choice), and assignment demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject, and showing skills of evaluation and analysis.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3186 - MEDIATION SKILLS
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test (open book/multiple choice), and assignment demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject, and showing skills of evaluation, analysis and research.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE1782 - THE ENGLISH LEGAL SYSTEM
Level 1 Module Year 20 credits
This course covers equity and the common law, the effect of European Community law on the English legal system, judicial precedent, statutory interpretation, the jury system, solicitors and barristers, tribunals, law centres and legal aid.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 2-hour lectures.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test (open book) and assignment.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2775 - THE ENGLISH LEGAL SYSTEM
Level 2 Module Year 20 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: 2-hour lectures.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test (open book/multiple choice), and assignment demonstrating skills of evaluation and analysis.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2776 - THE ENGLISH LEGAL SYSTEM
Level 3 Module Year 20 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: 2-hour lectures.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Continuous assessment based on class participation, class test (open book/multiple choice), and assignment demonstrating skills of evaluation, analysis and research.
Contact: Mrs Jan Stephens (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
 

LIFELONG LEARNING MUSIC MODULES

CE4347 - CHANTING AND OVERTONE SINGING
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is designed for anyone who is interested in music and who would like to know more about chanting and overtone singing (also known as throat singing). Any tone that we make with our voice contains a series of hidden tones that we don't normally hear. Overtone chanting isolates these overtones to produce an often beautiful sound. This class explores many forms of chanting and teaches you the first stages of overtoning. If you think that the human voice can produce only one note at a time, this style of singing will both surprise and delight! No singing skills are required.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours)
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Written assignment or presentation or portfolio of weekly exercises demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject.
Contact: Dr Nick Jones (Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4380 - THE MUSIC OF HERBIE HANCOCK
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module is a performance-based course for musicians wishing to discover the music of Herbie Hancock. It will chart the development of his compositions and recordings from the early 1960s to the present day.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours)
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Theoretical tests and assessed performance
Contact: Dr Nick Jones (Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4381 - THE MUSICALS OF THE 1940S AND 50S
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
The 1940s and 50s represent the Golden Age of musical theatre. The musicals from this period – including Annie Get Your Gun, Brigadoon, Guys and Dolls, My Fair Lady and West Side Story – established the standard, traditional show format as we know it today. This course will situate these musicals in their historical context, discuss their musical significance, and will provide biographical information on the main lyricists and composers, such as Irving Berlin, Frank Loesser, Alan Jay Lerner, Frederick Loewe and Leonard Bernstein.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours)
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Written assignment or presentation demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject.
Contact: Dr Nick Jones (Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4374 - THE NATURE OF THE VOICE AND ITS CARE
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
Among musicians, singers are probably the most aware of the biological principles that underlie their art. However many standard texts on singing technique give confused accounts of breathing and the actions of the larynx. The object of this module is first, to give a clear and accurate account of laryngeal function and breathing in the context of singing, and second, to present an up to date account of the more recent information that has become available on the physiology of singing and voice care. It will also deal with hearing in a musical context and its protection from noise related deafness, and the management of performance-related stress. Participants will have an opportunity to participate in a practical session in which they can monitor their breathing movements and analyse the sound spectrum of their voices to see the effects of vocal projection.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours)
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Class test and assignment demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject.
Contact: Dr Nick Jones (Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4375 - THE NATURE OF THE VOICE AND ITS CARE
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours)
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Class test and assignment demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject, and showing skills of evaluation and analysis.
Contact: Dr Nick Jones (Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4376 - THE NATURE OF THE VOICE AND ITS CARE
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour lectures (20 hours)
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Class test and assignment demonstrating knowledge and understanding of the subject, showing skills of evaluation, analysis and research.
Contact: Dr Nick Jones (Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
 

LIFELONG LEARNING PHILOSOPHY MODULES

PLEASE NOTE THAT MATHEMATICS ALSO OFFERS FREE-STANDING MATHEMATICS MODULES.
CE2521 - CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES IN ETHICS
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
A course on ethical controversies. It will examine a range of philosophical approaches, both historical and contemporary - and at practices such as euthanasia, surrogate motherhood, fox hunting and pornography.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Ten two-hour lectures/seminars (20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Essays or other equivalent written assignments to a total of 1500 words, demonstrating an understanding of core elements of the course material.
Contact: Ms P Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2759 - CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES IN ETHICS
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Ten two-hour lectures/seminars (20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Essays or other equivalent written assignments to a total of 1500-2000 words, demonstrating a critical understanding of core elements of the course material.
Contact: Ms P Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE2760 - CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES IN ETHICS
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Ten two-hour lectures/seminars (20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Essays or other equivalent written assignments to a total of 2000 words, demonstrating both critical analysis and an informed understanding of core elements of the course material.
Contact: Ms P Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4255 - ETHICS: EAST AND WEST
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
In this course we examine Hindu, Buddhist and Chinese ethical systems. These will be compared and contrasted with classical ethical beliefs, Christian ethics and more modern secular approaches. We also evaluate East-West approaches to contemporary moral debates and dilemmas, including war, animal welfare, capital punishment and abortion.
METHODS OF TEACHING: This course will be taught online. Course materials will be posted online. There will be regular email contact with the tutor. (Online equivalent of 20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Essays or other equivalent written assignments to a total of 1500 words demonstrating an understanding of core elements of the course material.
Contact: Ms P Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4256 - ETHICS: EAST AND WEST
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: This course will be taught online. Course materials will be posted online. There will be regular email contact with the tutor. (Online equivalent of 20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Essays or other equivalent written assignments to a total of 1500-2000 words, demonstrating a critical understanding of core elements of the course material.
Contact: Ms P Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4257 - ETHICS: EAST AND WEST
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: This course will be taught online. Course materials will be posted online. There will be regular email contact with the tutor. (Online equivalent of 20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Essays or other equivalent written assignments to a total of 2000 words, demonstrating both critical analysis and an informed understanding of core elements of the course material.
Contact: Ms P Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3972 - PHILOSOPHY OF LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course introduces philosophical problems relating to friendship, love and sexuality. It considers theories of human nature and emotion, and particular ethical problems. Topics include altruism, trust, sympathy, compassion, desire, pleasure and friendship as an intrinsically moral phenomenon. Both Western and Eastern approaches are explored.
METHODS OF TEACHING: This course will be taught online. Course materials will be posted online. There will be regular email contact with the tutor. (Online equivalent of 20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Essays or other equivalent written assignments to a total of 1500 words demonstrating an understanding of core elements of the course material.
Contact: Ms P Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3973 - PHILOSOPHY OF LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: This course will be taught online. Course materials will be posted online. There will be regular email contact with the tutor. (Online equivalent of 20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Essays or other equivalent written assignments to a total of 1500-2000 words, demonstrating a critical understanding of core elements of the course material.
Contact: Ms P Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3974 - PHILOSOPHY OF LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: This course will be taught online. Course materials will be posted online. There will be regular email contact with the tutor. (Online equivalent of 20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Essays or other equivalent written assignments to a total of 2000 words, demonstrating both critical analysis and an informed understanding of core elements of the course material.
Contact: Ms P Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4400 - PHILOSOPHY, PARAPSYCHOLOGY AND THE PARANORMAL
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This course explores the relation between philosophy, parapsychology and the paranormal. It introduces and examines the philosophical implications of supposed phenomena such as precognition and psychokinesis. Topics will include physicalism, causation, perception, scientific method, scepticism, the afterlife, Cartesian dualism, mind, time and space.
METHODS OF TEACHING: This course will be taught online. Course materials will be posted online. There will be regular email contact with the tutor. (Online equivalent of 20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Essays or other equivalent written assignments to a total of 1500 words demonstrating an understanding of core elements of the course material.
Contact: Ms P Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4401 - PHILOSOPHY, PARAPSYCHOLOGY AND THE PARANORMAL
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: This course will be taught online. Course materials will be posted online. There will be regular email contact with the tutor. (Online equivalent of 20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Essays or other equivalent written assignments to a total of 1500-2000 words, demonstrating a critical understanding of core elements of the course material.
Contact: Ms P Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4402 - PHILOSOPHY, PARAPSYCHOLOGY AND THE PARANORMAL
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: This course will be taught online. Course materials will be posted online. There will be regular email contact with the tutor. (Online equivalent of 20 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Essays or other equivalent written assignments to a total of 2000 words, demonstrating both critical analysis and an informed understanding of core elements of the course material.
Contact: Ms P Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
 

LIFELONG LEARNING SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENT MODULES

CE4188 - CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
Issues of sustainability and biodiversity are key to conserving scarce resources and protecting endangered species. This module looks at conservation management, using case histories from Wales and elsewhere, and examines the environmental implications of changes in land use such as agriculture and forestry and considers ways of mitigating their effects.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures, discussions and class exercises (20 contact hours), plus a field trip/day school (5 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: coursework (100%).
Contact: Dr Z Sobiesierski (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4190 - DISEASE IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module discusses diseases that are particularly associated with the Developing World. Some are transmitted by vectors and may also have animal reservoirs; others stem from food shortages, or from deficiencies in water supply and sanitation provision. The approach adopted is principally an ecological one and discusses the possibilities of control through habitat modification, technology transfer, raised awareness and medical intervention.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures, discussions and class exercises (20 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: coursework (50%). Written class test (50%).
Contact: Dr Z Sobiesierski (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE4189 - INFECTION CONTROL, PAST AND PRESENT
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module first considers the emergence of the germ theory of disease, and the attempts to control epidemic diseases such as cholera, typhoid and tuberculosis in the 19th century. It then goes on to discuss the discovery of antibacterial drugs, the development of immunisation programmes, and present day problems of hospital infections. Finally, consideration is given to the problems posed by new viral diseases such as HIV/AIDS, Lassa fever, Ebola fever and bird flu.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures, discussions and class exercises (20 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Coursework (50%). Written class test (50%).
Contact: Dr Z Sobiesierski (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
CE3968 - MEDICAL IMAGING AND THE HUMAN BODY
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
Up until the 20th century, our understanding of human anatomy came largely from dissection. Beginning with a brief history of anatomy, this module examines how the application of x-ray, ultrasound, magnetic resonance and other imaging techniques have allowed us to delve inside the body in different ways, and so develop a more detailed understanding of a variety of body functions and conditions.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures, discussions and class exercises (20 contact hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: coursework (50%). Written class test (50%).
Contact: Dr Z Sobiesierski (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 
 

LIFELONG LEARNING SOCIAL STUDIES MODULES

CE4385 - PEER MENTORING
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
Mentoring is used more and more, supporting individuals achieve their goals in many areas of life. As a mentor the course will develop your ability to establish rapport, develop listening skills and the ability to pick up and respond to issues raised by your mentee. Although highly practical the course will also include theory in order for you to reflect and evaluate mentoring practice.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Weekly 2-hour classes (20 contact hours)
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Written work up to a maximum of 1500 words. This will take the form of a review portfolio that demonstrates an understanding of the mentoring relationship in theory, and the ability to put strategies and techniques in practice.
Contact: Ms Louise Gray or Ms Pat Clark (Cardiff Centre for Lifelong Learning)
 

 

MATHEMATICS MODULES

PLEASE NOTE THAT LEARN ALSO OFFERS FREE-STANDING MATHEMATICS MODULES.
MA0291 - ACCOUNTANCY
Level 2 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module gives an appreciation of the nature and significance of Accounting in the private sector of the economy by an examination of the contribution it can make to the internal administration and external financing of a firm. The module also highlights the pivotal role of accounting as a service activity within a broad business context.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 2 hours lectures per week.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (100%).
Contact: Dr Dr A T Clarke (School of Mathematics)
 
MA0122 - ALGEBRA I
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module assumes a knowledge of the Mathematics A-Level core and aims to consolidate, develop and deepen algebraic material such as the binomial theorem, vectors and the geometry of lines and planes. Complex numbers and the geometry of curves such as ellipses and hyperbolae are also studied.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 27 hours lectures and 5 hours tutorial.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (85%), Coursework (15%).
REQUISITES: A-Level Mathematics at least grade A.
Contact: Dr Dr A T Clarke (School of Mathematics)
 
MA0125 - ALGEBRA II
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
The first part of this module studies sets of linear equations and their solutions. This leads on to a study of the properties of matrices and their connection with linear equations. Finally, an introduction is given to linear algebra.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 27 hours lectures and 5 hours tutorial.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (85%), Coursework (15%).
REQUISITES: Precursor module: MA0122
Contact: Dr Dr A T Clarke (School of Mathematics)
 
MA0001 - BASIC MATHEMATICS I
Foundation Level Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
A module covering the basic manipulative skills in mathematics which are required by students studying a scientific discipline.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 22 hours lectures and 11 hours tutorial.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (85%), Coursework (15%).
Contact: Dr A T Clarke (School of Mathematics)
 
MA0002 - BASIC MATHEMATICS II
Foundation Level Module Spring Semester 10 credits
A module covering the basic manipulative skills in mathematics, additional to those covered in Basic Mathematics I, which are required by students studying a scientific discipline. Competence in the techniques covered in Basic Mathematics I are a requirement for this module.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 22 hours lectures and 11 hours tutorial.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (85%), Coursework (15%).
Contact: Dr Dr A T Clarke (School of Mathematics)
 
MA0121 - CALCULUS METHODS I
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module assumes a knowledge of the Mathematics A-Level core and aims to consolidate and develop competence in differential and integral calculus. An introduction is also given to simple differential equations.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 27 hours lectures and 5 hours tutorial.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (85%), Coursework (15%).
REQUISITES: A-Level Mathematics at least grade A.
Contact: Dr Dr A T Clarke (School of Mathematics)
 
MA0124 - CALCULUS METHODS II
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module builds on MA0121 Calculus Methods I and extends the study of differential equations to second-order equations. The module also studies definite integrals, embracing theory, calculation and applications.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 27 hours lectures and 5 hours tutorial.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (85%), Coursework (15%).
REQUISITES: Precursor module: MA0121
Contact: Dr Dr A T Clarke (School of Mathematics)
 
MA0111 - ELEMENTARY NUMBER THEORY I
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module describes the basic properties of integers and of polynomials in a single variable, and discusses the similarities and connections between them.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 27 hours lectures and 5 hours tutorial.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (85%), Coursework (15%).
REQUISITES: A-Level Mathematics at least grade A.
Contact: Dr Dr A T Clarke (School of Mathematics)
 
MA0105 - INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module provides an introduction to the basic ideas and methods of probability and the structure by which they are formalised. It develops the concepts of random variables, expectation and variance and introduces some fundamental probability distributions.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 27 hours lectures and 5 hours tutorial.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (85%), Coursework (15%).
REQUISITES: A-Level Mathematics at least grade A.
Contact: Dr Dr A T Clarke (School of Mathematics)
 
MA1300 - MECHANICS I
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
A lecture based module introducing Newtonian dynamics. This module is a prerequisite for some later modules in classical applied mathematics and is strongly recommended for all those intending further study in applied mathematics of whatever sort.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures 27 hours, tutorials 5 hours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Spring Examination 2 Hours (85%) and Coursework (15%).
REQUISITES: Pre-cursor Module: MA0104.
Contact: Dr A T Clarke (School of Mathematics)
 
MA0104 - MODELLING
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module introduces the process of mathematical modelling and illustrates it with a range of examples using difference equations and first-order differential equations.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 27 hours lectures and 5 hours tutorial.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (85%), Coursework (15%). REQUISITES: A-Level Mathematics at least grade A.
Contact: Dr Dr A T Clarke (School of Mathematics)
 
MA0152 - STATISTICAL INFERENCE I
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
The role of statistics in the modern world is ever increasing and applications can be found in a wide variety of areas including science, industry, government and commerce making a basic understanding of statistics an essential skill. This is a lecture based module given at an introductory level on statistical inference to develop an understanding of the basic principles of statistics, used in situations where the full picture of a problem (population) is unknown and must be inferred from collected data (random sample)
This module will be accessible to those who have knowledge of A-level Pure Mathematics and an Introduction to Probability. No previous knowledge of statistics is assumed. It will prepare students for all modules with statistics and probability content in future years of the degree scheme.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Formally organised time is as follows: Lectures 27 hours, tutorials 5 hours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Spring Examination 2 Hours (85%) and Coursework (15%).
REQUISITES: Pre-cursor Module: MA0105.
Contact: Dr M Davidson (School of Mathematics)
 
 

NURSING AND MIDWIFERY MODULES

Students who would like to take these modules must be working in an area of clinical practice that allows achievement of the learning outcomes and clinical/theory hours of the particular modules the student wishes to register for.
NR3152 - ASSESSMENT AND CARE MANAGEMENT (MENTAL HEALTH)
Level 3 Module Year 20 credits
The module aims to enable the student to develop the requisite knowledge and skills to deliver effective, comprehensive and individualised care in a variety of settings. It aims to enhance mental health professionals' knowledge and clinical skills in problem orientated case management for people with severe and enduring mental health problems. It further aims to address the development of long term care in community settings, by facilitating the development of reflective practitioners who are able to act as assertive case managers and demonstrate advanced communication and interpersonal skills. It also aims to develop in students the skills of implementing innovative approaches to case work in complex organisations.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 200 hours over a period of 13 weeks which consists of: 100 hours theory (40 hours taught, 60 hours self directed study), plus 100 hours application to clinical practice.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Theoretical assessment comprises a 2500 word critical discussion of a specified aspect of the assessment and care management of people with psychosis, with reference to theory, evidence and application to practice. Clinical assessment comprises a video taped clinical session with a simulated client and a Reflective Analysis of the taped session.
Contact: School Information desk, School of Nursing & Midwifery Studies
 
NR3032 - COGNITIVE BEHAVIOURAL INTERVENTIONS
Level 3 Module Year 20 credits
The module explores the cognitive behavioural conceptualisation of mental ill health and aims to enable mental health practitioners to develop their knowledge and skills in cognitive behaviour therapy across a number of settings and to facilitate practice of cognitive behavioural interventions with service users experiencing moderate and severe mental illness. Skill fidelity is met through rigorous skills rehearsal, skills monitoring, supervision and feedback.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 200 hours over a period of 14 weeks which consists of: 100 hours theory (40 hours taught, 60 hours self directed study), plus 100 hours application to clinical practice.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Theoretical assessment comprises a 2500 word critical discussion of cognitive behavioural working with clients experiencing psychosis, with reference to theory, evidence and application to practice. Clinical assessment comprises a video taped clinical session with a simulated client and a Reflective Analysis of the taped session.
Contact: School Information desk, School of Nursing & Midwifery Studies
 
NR3047 - COUNSELLING SKILLS FOR HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE PRACTITIONERS
Level 3 Module Year 60 credits
This module provides underpinning knowledge and opportunities for counselling skills development for health and social care practitioners.

The focus is the person centred approach to engagement with clients/patients, and students are enabled to explore the key practical and ethical issues involved in the use of the approach, practice models and counselling skills through regular practice and reflection upon their experiences. To enhance these processes, the module study days are presented mainly through both sessions of active learning, exploration and discussion, and periods of videoed and live skills practice in which students are encouraged and enabled to apply their learning.

To maximise student learning and promote self-awareness, the skills work is undertaken in triads, to enable skills development (helper role), to provide some understanding of the client/patient’s experience (client’s role) and to develop observation and critical appraisal skills and confidence in the provision of feedback (observer role).
METHODS OF TEACHING: 300 hrs: 216 hrs taught, 84 hrs self-directed study, 300 hrs application to clinical practice) 26 week module with 26 taught study days.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Theoretical assessment comprises a 5000 word written assignment, which demonstrates the student’s knowledge and understanding, and highlights their intentional and ethical use of counselling skills. Clinical assessment comprises an extract from a video diary of the student’s counselling skills development compiled during the module, plus a 2000 word reflective account of their use of counselling skills illustrated through the recounting and analysis of their chosen video extract.
Contact: School Information desk, School of Nursing & Midwifery Studies
 
NR3107 - DIABETES CARE AND MANAGEMENT
Level 3 Module Year 30 credits
The module aims to provide participants with the knowledge and skills to effectively care for individuals with diabetes in the primary, community and secondary care settings.

The broad aim of the module is to facilitate learning and provide participants with the knowledge, skills and competencies to care for individuals with diabetes. The development of these skills will enable health professionals to provide a high quality, patient centred, effective and efficient service to individuals with diabetes in any setting.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 300 hours over a 20 week period. (150 hours theory of which 60 hours taught, 30 hours guided study and 60 hours independent study. 150 hours application to practice in the students work environment). Distance learning with 10 taught contact days. Students will be expected to negotiate time with their managers to undertake both the clinical practice and the distance learning components of the course.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: The summative assignment will build on the audit undertaken as the formative assessment. It will comprise of 3,000 words.
Contact: School Information desk, School of Nursing & Midwifery Studies
 
NR3033 - EVIDENCE BASED INTERVENTIONS WITH FAMILIES
Level 3 Module Year 20 credits
The overarching aim of the module is to equip mental health practitioners with the necessary knowledge, skills and confidence to deliver family interventions in their clinical practice. Within this, the module aims to broaden and deepen practitioners’ knowledge and understanding of the theoretical concepts and evidence base that underpin family work; to develop, in a safe environment, the essential clinical skills utilised in working with families; to develop practitioners’ confidence in their ability to implement the skills in their own clinical practice; to develop understanding of the issues involved in the implementation of family work in routine clinical practice and strategies for overcoming the barriers to its use.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 200 hours over a period of 14 weeks which consists of: 100 hours theory (40 hours taught, 60 hours self directed study), plus 100 hours application to clinical practice.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Theoretical assessment comprises a 2500 word critical discussion of a specified aspect of working with families, with reference to theory, evidence and application to practice. Clinical assessment comprises an audio taped clinical session with a family and a Reflective Analysis of the taped session.
Contact: School Information desk, School of Nursing & Midwifery Studies
 
NR3003 - LEADERSHIP & MANAGEMENT IN HEALTHCARE ORGANISATIONS
Level 3 Module Year 30 credits
The professional nurse operating at all levels in a healthcare organisation requires an understanding of management issues and the development of the appropriate skills required to lead nursing practice.

The module aims to provide three distinct groups of nurses with a foundation in management and leadership theory and practice as it relates to health care organisations.

1. Nurses with a primary management role aspiring to a career in management. The module will provide members of this group who have previously had little or no management education, with the opportunity to construct and/or consolidate a sound foundation on which to further build the knowledge and skills required in their particular area of management.

2. Nurses who have a primary clinical/education/research role and who have a leadership/management component in their job. The module will provide this group with a similar opportunity as those in the group above, along with an opportunity to explore the practical relationship between aspects of management practice and clinical/education/research practice.

3. Nurses who currently do not have a management component in their job, however they interact with management. This group will have the opportunity to develop an understanding of the nature and role of leadership/management and their relationship as practitioners to management in delivering effective healthcare services. The module will prepare nurses to become effective leaders and managers of healthcare in the future.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 300 hours over 15 weeks (1 day per week for 15 weeks = 90 hours taught, 60 hours self directed study, 150 hours application to clinical practice).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: The theory summative assignment will consist of a 3,500 word management project, which must be completed by the final day of the course.
Contact: School Information desk, School of Nursing & Midwifery Studies
 
NR3105 - WOMEN AND HEALTH
Level 3 Module Year 40 credits
The module aims to enable practitioners to develop evidence-based knowledge and skills required for health care provision for women. It aims to develop the ability to apply the evidence base to practice within a range of women’s health care. In addition, it will provide an opportunity for practitioners to develop associated knowledge and skills to provide holistic care for women.
METHODS OF TEACHING: The module will be delivered over a 20 week period.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: The summative assessment consists of the following components:
1. Clinical Assessment- Reflection of a Clinical Incident (2000 words) and Record of Clinical Achievement. 2. Theory Assessment - Seminar presentation (20 minutes) and Essay (3500 words).
Contact: School Information desk, School of Nursing & Midwifery Studies
 
NR3049 - WORKING WITH ALCOHOL AND DRUG RELATED PROBLEMS
Level 3 Module Year 30 credits
Workers in health, social and voluntary sectors are increasingly coming into contact with the mental, physical and social sequelae of recreational drug use. Effective, brief interventions are proven clinically effective, and an understanding of the role of recreational substances in the course of physical and mental illness can help the health professional encourage health promotion in affected individuals. The principles of harm minimisation and motivational approaches to health can impact on change for the better in a variety of settings.

The aims of this module, therefore, are to provide practitioners, who are in contact with recreational drug users, with an understanding of the role and historical context of recreational substance use in society, knowledge of the effects of recreational substances and of effective interventions for problem substance users. Theory will be underpinned by ethical, moral and professional consideration across agency divides.

The module further aims to provide the skills necessary to assess and provide effective, evidence based brief interventions for recreational drug users. These interventions will be underpinned by the theory of harm minimisation and based on the principles of motivational interviewing.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 300 hours over 15 weeks which consists of: 150 theory (90 hours taught / 60 hours self directed study) 150 application to clinical practice).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Theoretical assessment comprises a 3000 word critical review of the current literature relating to an aspect of recreational substance use. Clinical assessment comprises a 2000 word reflective account of interactions with a recreational drug user in any stage of change.
Contact: School Information desk, School of Nursing & Midwifery Studies
 
 

PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY MODULES

PX1112 - ATOMS, NUCLEI AND MATTER
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
A on module course based on lectures and exercises providing an introduction to the foundations of modern physics. The three major areas covered are the atom, the nucleus and the states of matter.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures: 22 x 1 hour, Exercises.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour written exam 80% and Coursework 20%.
Contact: Professor P A R Ade (School of Physics & Astronomy)
 
PX1110 - COSMOS
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
A single module, lecture based and open to all, which provides (with minimum mathematics) an account of the key concepts in cosmology, a description of the solar system, an introduction to the properties of stars and galaxies, and a discussion of the history of astronomy and its influence on the development of scientific thought.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 22 one hour lectures; 6 one hour problem classes; 6 three hour homework assignments; background reading (6 x 3 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Two hour examination (Autumn) (80%); continuous assessment (20%).
Contact: Dr H Gomez (School of Physics & Astronomy)
 
PX1214 - DYNAMICS & RELATIVITY
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
A one module course based on lectures and exercises providing an introduction to the foundations of mechanics, motion and relativity.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures: 22 x 1 hour, Exercises.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour written exam 80% and Coursework 20%.
Contact: Professor B Sathyaprakash (School of Physics & Astronomy)
 
PX1219 - ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
A one module course based on lectures and exercises providing an introduction to the foundations of electricity and magnetism.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures 22 x 1 hour, Exercises.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour written examination (80%) and Coursework (20%)
REQUISITES: Pre-cursor Module: PX1116 Mathematics for Physical Scientists I
Co-requisites: PX1216 Mathematics for Physical Scientists II
Contact: Dr P Hargrave (School of Physics & Astronomy)
 
PX1218 - HOW THE HUMAN BODY WORKS
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
A one module course based on lectures which provide an introduction to human physiology.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour written examination (Spring) (100%).
Contact: Professor J Woodcock (School of Physics & Astronomy)
 
PX1117 - INVESTIGATIVE PHYSICS I
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
A one module practical course providing an introduction to performing experiments in physics together with treatment of experimental errors and safety aspects.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Laboratory sessions 11 x 4 hours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Laboratory work 100%.
Contact: Dr P M Smowton (School of Physics & Astronomy)
 
PX1217 - INVESTIGATIVE PHYSICS II
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
A one module practical course providing an introduction to performing experiments in physics together with treatment of experimental errors and safety aspects.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Laboratory sessions 11 x 4 hours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Laboratory work 100%.
Contact: Dr P M Smowton (School of Physics & Astronomy)
 
PX1116 - MATHEMATICS FOR PHYSICAL SCIENTISTS I
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
An Autumn semester course providing mathematical techniques and their applications within a physics context, based on lectures and exercises for first year physics students. It covers vectors, series, functions and graphs, and elementary calculus.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures: 22 x 1 hour, Exercises.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour written exam 80% and Coursework 20%.
Contact: Dr C C Matthai (School of Physics & Astronomy)
 
PX1216 - MATHEMATICS FOR PHYSICAL SCIENTISTS II
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
A Spring semester course providing mathematical techniques and their applications within a physics context, based on lectures and exercises for first year physics students. It covers complex numbers, vector calculus, differential equations and an introduction to probability.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures: 22 x 1 hour, Exercises.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour written exam - 80% and Coursework - 20%.
Contact: Professor A P Whitworth (School of Physics & Astronomy)
 
PX0103 - MATHS PRACTICE FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCES
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 10 credits
This module is a regular series of example classes with special, structured worksheets which will reinforce and develop the manipulative and analytic skills of students studying elementary mathematics for science. Students will be required to make a reasonable attempt at least 80% of the worksheets. The examination will be based on questions which are very similar to those worked through in class. Areas to be covers: Algebra, powers, logarithms and exponentials; Differentiation; Vectors and trigonometry; Integration, and further integration techniques; Simple first order differential equations and their solution; Complex numbers; and Application of mathematics to physical problems.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 2 x 1 hour exercise classes per week.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 70% Autumn Examination 2 Hours and 30% Coursework.
Contact: Dr R Smith (School of Physics and Astronomy)
 
PX1220 - VIBRATIONS AND WAVES
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
A one-module course based on lectures and exercises providing an introduction to the foundations of vibrations and waves in physics.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures 22 x 1 hour, Exercises.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour written examination (80%) and Coursework (20%)
Contact: Dr B E Richardson (School of Physics & Astronomy)
 
 

PHYSIOLOGY MODULES

PL1005 - THE WAY THE BODY WORKS
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
The broad principles of Physiology. The nervous system, its nature, structure and function. The cardiovascular system and the roles of the heart, blood vessels and blood. Changes in disease. Breathing and lung function. The digestion and absorption of food. Motherhood and the physiology of the newborn child.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures (24 hours), tutorials (2x1 hour), guided study (10 hours).
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1.5 hour written examination (Spring) 70% and Coursework 30%
Contact: Dr T J Allen (Cardiff School of Biosciences)
 
 

PSYCHOLOGY MODULES

Important Note:All students should note that PS1106 (General Psychology) and PS1107 (Introduction to Cognitive and Biological Psychology) take a scientific approach to psychology, with an emphasis on experimentation and the quantitative evaluation of evidence to test theories. These modules typically require some study outside of lectures, and are not suitable for students who desire nothing more than an informal armchair introduction to the subject.
PS1106 - GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
Level 1 Module Double Semester 20 credits
The course will provide a broad overview of psychology and its methods of research. The course is divided into four sections, taught by different lecturers.
Section 1 is an introduction to abnormal psychology from relatively mild psychological disorders like panic attacks and compulsive cleaning, through to schizophrenia.
Section 2 is an introduction to the psychology of growth and change across the lifespan.
Section 3 is an introduction to the scientific methodologies used by psychology. How do psychologists develop and test psychological theories?
Section 4 is an introduction to social psychology and psychological explanations of socially important phenomena such as racial prejudice. METHODS OF TEACHING: 22 x 1 hour lectures.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: One piece of written coursework, 10% and Two hour MCQ examination covering all areas of the course, 90%.
Contact: Dr J Culling (School of Psychology)
Important note: All students should note that PS1106 (General Psychology) and PS1107 (Introduction to Cognitive and Biological Psychology) take a scientific approach to psychology, with an emphasis on experimentation and the quantitative evaluation of psychology, to test theories. These modules typically require some study outside of lectures, and are not suitable for students who desire nothing more than an informal armchair introduction to the subject.
 
PS1107 - INTRO TO COGNITIVE & BIOLOGICAL PSYCH.
Level 1 Module Double Semester 20 credits
The module will provide a basic introduction to the main topics in cognitive psychology and how brain function relates to aspects of cognition. The module will examine basic aspects of human cognition such as learning, memory, thought and consciousness. The students will also receive an introduction to aspects of brain function at the level of discrete anatomical regions and how these brain regions relate to learning, memory and psychopathology. The course will draw on material from brain-damaged humans and non-humans to illustrate the natural fracture lines of behaviour. The students will also receive an introduction to experimental design and methods in psychology.
METHODS OF TEACHING: 22 x 1 hour lectures.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Two hour MCQ examination covering all areas of the course 90% and One essay, 10%.
Contact: Professor R Honey (School of Psychology)

Important Note:
All students should note that PS1106 (General Psychology) and PS1107 (Introduction to Cognitive and Biological Psychology) take a scientific approach to psychology, with an emphasis on experimentation and the quantitative evaluation of evidence to test theories. These modules typically require some study outside of lectures, and are not suitable for students who desire nothing more than an informal armchair introduction to the subject.
 
 

RELIGIOUS AND THEOLOGICAL STUDIES MODULES

RT2306 - ANCIENT, MEDIAEVAL AND MODERN JUDAISM
Level 3 Module Double Semester 20 credits
The module examines the key ideas and principles in the development and structure of Judaism during the past 2,000 plus years. As the history of the Jewish religion is hardly separable from the history of the Jewish people, it also provides an overview of Jewish history generally, and a more detailed insight into the history of those periods which are considered of special significance for the development of religious ideas. The emphasis, however, is on the intellectual and religious history of Judaism, the structure of Jewish religious thought, the ideas and events which have moulded and influenced it, and the challenges it has faced in ancient, medieval and modern times.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and seminars
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (worth 75% of the final mark) and coursework (worth 25%)
Contact: Religious and Theological Studies School Office.
 
RT3321 - APOCALYPSE NOW! NEW TESTAMENT ESCHATOLOGY
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
For most people, Revelation is a book that is either largely ignored, or it is the object of such fanatical study and fanciful interpretation that it passes from the realm of the interesting and helpful into the realm of fantasy and speculation. Much literature has been published in recent years on its interpretation - some of which is scholarly and technical, and some of which is populist and accessible. The problem is that the technical and scholarly material frequently requires careful and detailed study, combined with an advanced level of knowledge, whereas much of the populist material tends toward the fanatical and fanciful. The aim of this module is to bridge this gap, equipping students to critically evaluate a range of interpretative approaches to Revelation. Students will also gain confidence in formulating and articulating their own approach to the Apocalypse, based on engagement with recent relevant academic scholarship.
Methods of teaching: Lectures and seminars.
Methods of assessment: two essays of 3,000 words each.
Contact Religious and Theological Studies School Office.
 
RT1339 - BODIES, SPIRITS, AND SOULS: THE PERSON, ETHICS, AND RELIGION
Level 3 Module Double Semester 20 credits
This module examines the notion of the person in Buddhism, Hinduism, and indigenous religions within Africa, the Americas and Oceania, through a comparative study of ideas about body, soul, re-birth, and consciousness. Highlighting ethical debates concerning family, community, gender and violence, it suggests ways in which these debates have been influenced by practitioners' engagements (including dream or trance states) with animals, ancestors, spirits, demons, and deities. The role of religious specialists such as shamans will be explored, with reference to issues of power, resistance, and moral authority in the contemporary world.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and seminars
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Two essays of 3,000 words each.
Contact: Religious & Theological Studies School Office
 
RT6310 - CHRISTIANITY AND SCIENCE
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 20 credits
Kyoto, the Indonesian tsunami, Dolly the sheep, GM crops, designer babies, the beginning and end of the universe - this module will explore some of the key questions raised by scientific discoveries, and address the disputes that have surrounded the conceptual revolutions in science, especially those brought about by Galileo, Newton and Darwin. The implications of the discoveries of chance, design and evolution for our understanding of a creator God and of human persons will be examined. Natural suffering through weather patterns and tectonic movements of the crust will be discussed, and genetic engineering and cloning will be critiqued. Our ethical approach to the environment and to the use of energy resources will be explored, and the module will conclude by asking what meaning and hope is found both within and beyond scientific research.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 100% Coursework 2 essays of 3,000 words each.
Contact: Religious and Theological Studies School Office
 
RT4207 - EARLY CELTIC RELIGION
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 20 credits
What did the early Welsh and Irish believe about their gods and goddesses? What did pre-Christian and early Christian forms of religion look like in ritual and practice? This module aims to introduce and investigate these and other questions about the religions of the Celtic inhabitants of Ireland, the British Isles and Gaul. Following a number of investigative paradigms, this module will examine and contextualise the literary and material evidence for Celtic civilisations up to the Normanization of Britain from the 1100 CE onwards, by critically evaluating the cultural ‘artefacts’ of these societies, including their Myths, Sagas, Annals, Laws, Saints’ Lives, Archaeology and Inscriptions. The module will also consider in detail the relationship between other forms of paganism in this period, principally Greco-Roman religious paradigms, which will also entail considering the process of Christianisation of Britain, Ireland and Gaul.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: An essay of 4,000 words and a journal of 3,000 words.
Contact: Religious and Theological Studies School Office
 
RT1215 - EMOTIONS, SYMBOLS, AND RITUALS: STUDYING SOCIETIES THROUGH FILM
Level 2 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
Drawing from the anthropology of religion, this module uses films and texts to explore the nature of emotions within the individual and society. Using examples from a number of cultures, including those of Aboriginal Australia, the Amazon, and Africa, it suggests ways in which horror, laughter, anger, and love are expressed and shaped through symbolism. Rites of passage surrounding birth, marriage, initiation, and death are examined, highlighting their engagement with the relationship between emotions, symbols, and the body. While symbols and emotions may be employed to maintain a sense of balance and harmony in society, they may also express tensions, divisions, and hierarchies. Problems associated with the study and interpretation of emotions and symbols will be raised, for example, women are represented by men, and indigenous peoples are represented by western scholarship and media.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Two essays of 3,000 words each.
Contact: Religious & Theological Studies School Office
 
RT2103 - INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 20 credits
This course will introduce students to the literature of the Bible - the Hebrew Old Testament and the Greek New Testament - and help them begin to assess its significance by developing the use of critical tools. We shall ask what it means to study this literature at all and look at some of the approaches, which characterised scholarly work on the Old Testament and the New Testament up to the present. Students will be introduced to the main literary genres of both the Old Testament and the New and be helped to feel familiar with the contents of all the canonical books.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (Spring) (worth 60% of the final mark) and coursework worth 40%
Contact: Religious and Theological Studies School Office
 
RT1211 - ISLAM IN THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD
Level 2 Module Double Semester 20 credits
This module critically investigates a number of debates and topics relating to Islam and the Contemporary Muslim World. We shall particularly focus upon Islam in its Western European setting, especially Britain. Among the areas to be covered are Islam in Britain and Europe; family & community life; women and gender; Islam in the media and attitudes to Islam; blasphemy and the Satanic Verses controversy; the Muslim world post 9/11; Islam, modernity and globalisation; and world-wide Islamic movements. The module aims to enable you to rigorously and empathetically engage with a range of issues affecting Islam and Muslims in the modern context. There will be some seminars held in the evenings which all students will be expected to attend.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and Seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 essays of 3,000 words each
Contact: Religious &Theological Studies School Office.
 
RT1217 - RELIGION AND GENDER
Level 2 Module Spring Semester 20 credits
Gender studies has had an enormous impact on research in the Arts and Humanities and on Religious and Theological Studies in particular. This course presents an exciting opportunity for students to familiarise themselves with one of the great critical intellectual movements of the twentieth century as it pertains to the study of religion and also to explore the construction and negotiation of gender roles in a variety of specific religious contexts. The course will involve the analysis of a diverse range of media both historical and contemporary from ancient text to modern cinema.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Two essays of 2,500 words each.
Contact: Religious & Theological Studies School Office
 
RT1108 - RELIGION, CULTURE AND SOCIETY I
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
An introduction to two religions: Hinduism and Buddhism. The course will include the historical development and key concepts, teachings and practices of each, and will consider themes such as gender and sexuality, film and visual culture, literatures and religion, for example. A primary focus of the course is to introduce the academic study of religion through the use of methodological approaches and theoretical tools. This module is normally required as a foundation for the study of particular traditions at levels 2 and 3.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (60%), coursework (40%)
Contact: Religious and Theological Studies School Office
 
RT1214 - THE LIFE OF THE BUDDHA
Level 2 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
This module will provide a critical overview of the ways in which accounts of the life of the Buddha have been a resource for the fashioning of religious and political identities in South Asia and beyond. The course will consider the primary source materials available for the study of the life of the Buddha and different ways in which these materials have been interpreted by academics: as sources of historical data, as evidence of the shaping ideals of the early Buddhist community and as narratives connected to broader social, political and philosophical debates in South Asia and beyond. The course will provide a broad examination of the conventions and functions of biography in relation to scriptural, inscriptional, and visual evidence in the history of Buddhist traditions. In particular, it will look at the ways in which the construction and re-construction of the life of the Buddha can give us clues concerning changing patterns of historical, political and religious consciousness amongst Buddhists both within, and beyond, South Asia.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (worth 75% of the final mark) and coursework (25%).
Contact: Religious and Theological Studies School Office
 
RT4103 - THE STORY OF CHRISTIANITY
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
This module will provide students with an introduction to traditional methods in historical Christian theology and an historical overview of major movements in the history of the church. It will also provide an introduction to the main themes in the history of Christian thought and the skills necessary for students to be able to present a competently written and adequately structured and argued essay that is accurate and apposite in its use of references and bibliography.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures, seminars and coursework.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 2 hour examination (worth 60% of the final mark) and coursework (worth 40%)
Contact: Religious and Theological Studies School Office
 
RT6312 - WAR AND ETHICS IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
Level 3 Module Double Semester 20 credits
This module will examine the phenomenon of war and the ethics of limiting violence from earliest historical times down to the 21st century. The emphasis will be on reading the writings of key historians, philosophers, political analysts and theologians in their historical context and in connection with the meaning their views have for the contemporary world. Authors to be studied includ Thucydides, Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, Grotius and Clausewitz. Readings will also include legal texts that bear on the customary laws of nations and the international treaties designed to limit war and curtail violence. The aim of the module is to develop a holistic understanding of war as an ethical and political problem.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures and Seminars.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Dissertation of 6,000 to 7,000 words.
Contact: Religious and Theological Studies School Office
 
 

WELSH MODULES

THE FOLLOWING MODULES ARE TAUGHT THROUGH THE MEDIUM OF ENGLISH.Many advertisements for posts in Wales stress that a knowledge of Welsh is a desirable qualification. So if you intend to work here, you can start Welsh from scratch or upgrade your proficiency in the language by studying for up to 40 credits a year in the School of Welsh. We also offer general modules on Wales and its culture, taught through the medium of English, and modules for those who wish to learn basic Irish.
CY1732 - MODERN WELSH LITERATURE
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
Wales has a rich literary tradition, not least in the twentieth century, which despite the decline of the Welsh language during that period, was to prove a high point in the long history of Welsh literature. The same period also saw the emergence of significant Welsh writing in English. This module provides a general overview of the development of Welsh literature in the modern period, concentrating especially on some of the key figures of twentieth-century Welsh literature. The main focus will be on Welsh-language material in English translation, but there will also be some discussion of Welsh writing generated in English.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures, seminars and study tours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Coursework (100%).
Contact: School Office (School of Welsh).
 
CY3732 - MODERN WELSH LITERATURE
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures, seminars and study tours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Coursework (100%).
Contact: School Office (School of Welsh).
 
CY1733 - WALES AND THE WELSH LANGUAGE
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
This module provides a basic introduction to the Welsh language and its history and to culture and identity in Modern Wales. The module includes a strong comparative international dimension so that events and characteristics features of Welsh life are placed within main currents of international thought and development. It also includes a basic introduction to the rudiments of the Welsh language.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures, language classes and study tours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Coursework (100%).
Contact: School Office (School of Welsh).
 
CY3733 - WALES AND THE WELSH LANGUAGE
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures, language classes and study tours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Coursework (100%).
Contact: School Office (School of Welsh).
 
CY1774 - WELSH 1
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
This module is for those with no previous knowledge of Welsh. It introduces basic vocabulary and sentence structure in both the oral and written media.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Workshops and practical classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 x 1.5 hour examination (25%); coursework (25%); oral test (25%); aural test (25%).
Contact: Lowri Wyn Davies (School of Welsh).
 
CY3774 - WELSH 1
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Workshops and practical classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 x 1.5 hour examination (25%); coursework (25%); oral test (25%); aural test (25%).
Contact: Lowri Wyn Davies (School of Welsh).
 
CY1775 - WELSH 2
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 20 credits
This module builds on the vocabulary and structures introduced in Welsh 1 enabling you to communicate more fully and in a wider range of contexts in both the oral and written media. The standard attained is comparable to GCSE (second language) level.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Workshops and practical classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 x 1.5 hour examination (25%); coursework (25%); oral test (25%); aural test (25%).
Contact: Lowri Wyn Davies (School of Welsh).
 
CY3775 - WELSH 2
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 20 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Workshops and practical classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 x 1.5 hour examination (25%); coursework (25%); oral test (25%); aural test (25%).
Contact: Lowri Wyn Davies (School of Welsh).
 
CY1776 - WELSH 3
Level 1 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
If you already have a basic command of Welsh, or have passed Welsh as a second language at GCSE level, you can continue your studies with this module. It builds on the vocabulary and structures of Welsh 2.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Workshops and practical classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 x 1.5 hour examination (25%); coursework (25%); oral test (25%); aural test (25%).
Contact: Lowri Wyn Davies (School of Welsh).
 
CY3776 - WELSH 3
Level 3 Module Autumn Semester 20 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Workshops and practical classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 x 1.5 hour examination (25%); coursework (25%); oral test (25%); aural test (25%).
Contact: Lowri Wyn Davies (School of Welsh).
 
CY1777 - WELSH 4
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 20 credits
This module builds on the vocabulary and structures of Welsh 3 and attains a standard comparable to AS (second language) level.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Workshops and practical classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 x 1.5 hour examination (25%); coursework (25%); oral test (25%); aural test (25%).
Contact: Lowri Wyn Davies (School of Welsh).
 
CY3777 - WELSH 4
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 20 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Workshops and practical classes.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: 1 x 1.5 hour examination (25%); coursework (25%); oral test (25%); aural test (25%).
Contact: Lowri Wyn Davies (School of Welsh).
 
CY1734 - WELSH CULTURE AND FOLKLORE
Level 1 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
Why is there a dragon on the Welsh flag? Who was King Arthur? Where was the Celtic Otherworld? This module will give the student a general introduction to the culture and folklore of Wales, including its folktales, its customs and legendary heroes.
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures, seminars and study tours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Coursework (100%).
Contact: School Office (School of Welsh).
 
CY3734 - WELSH CULTURE AND FOLKLORE
Level 3 Module Spring Semester 10 credits
METHODS OF TEACHING: Lectures, seminars and study tours.
METHODS OF ASSESSMENT: Coursework (100%).
Contact: School Office (School of Welsh).
 
 

WELSH MODULES/MODIWLAU CYMRAEG A CHYMREIG

THE FOLLOWING MODULES ARE TAUGHT THROUGH THE MEDIUM OF WELSH
CY3950 - CANU'R GYMRU NEWYDD: BARDDONIAETH 1990-2010 [POETRY OF THE NEW WALES: POETRY 1990- 2010]
Modiwl lefel 3 Gwanwyn 10 credyd
‘Chwa o awyr iach’ oedd disgrifiad Alan Llwyd o fuddugoliaeth Myrddin ap Dafydd ac Iwan Llwyd ym mhrif wobrau Eisteddfod Genedlaethol Cwm Rhymni, 1990. Bu’r digwyddiad hwn yn sail i ddegawd a welodd ddadeni llewyrchus iawn ym myd barddoniaeth Gymraeg, a barddoniaeth gaeth yn arbennig. Ac nid oerodd gwreichion y dadeni hwn wedi troad y mileniwm. Gwelodd degawd cyntaf y ganrif newydd sawl datblygiad pwysig, ynghyd â dyfodiad ton newydd o feirdd ifainc caeth a rhydd i hawlio eu lle ar lwyfan y festri, y dafarn a’r eisteddfod. Bydd y modiwl hwn yn dadansoddi prif weithiau a themâu beirdd pwysicaf y ddau ddegawd cynhyrfus hyn, yn ogystal â thrafod arwyddocâd y dadeni barddol yn y Gymru gyfoes.
DULLIAU DYSGU:Darlithoedd, seminarau a dosbarthiadau darllen.
DULLIAU ASESU:Traethawd hyd at 2,000 o eiriau (100%)
AMODAU:Os bydd myfyrwyr nad ydynt wedi ennill cymhwyster Safon Uwch yn yr iaith yn dymuno dilyn y modiwl bydd yn rhaid iddynt fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Swyddfa’r Ysgol (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY1699 - CWRS GLOYWI [IMPROVING LANGUAGE SKILLS]
Modiwl lefel 1 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
Hyrwyddo a datblygu gafael myfyrwyr ail-iaith ar Gymraeg ysgrifenedig safonol yw diben y modiwl hwn. Tywysir y myfyrwyr yn drefnus drwy batrymau sylfaenol cystrawen yr iaith. Bydd pwyslais ar waith ymarferol.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd a gweithdai.
DULLIAU ASESU: Ymarferion (25%), profion dosbarth (25%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig. Modiwl ar gyfer myfyrwyr ail-iaith yw hwn.
Cysylltwch â: Swyddfa’r Ysgol (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3699 - CWRS GLOYWI [IMPROVING LANGUAGE SKILLS]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd a gweithdai.
DULLIAU ASESU: Ymarferion (25%), Profion dosbarth (25%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig. Modiwl ar gyfer myfyrwyr ail-iaith yw hwn.
Cysylltwch â: Swyddfa’r Ysgol (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3355 - CYFIEITHU PROFFESIYNOL [PROFESSIONAL TRANSLATING]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref 10 credyd
Bwriad y modiwl hwn yw rhoi cyflwyniad i gyfieithu proffesiynol. Mae mwy o gyfleoedd am swyddi yn y maes hwn nag erioed o’r blaen, ac mae’r galw am gyfieithwr da ar gynnydd. Bydd y modiwl hwn, felly, yn cyflwyno’r technegau sylfaenol y mae eu hangen ar gyfieithwyr da. Bydd cyfle i’r myfyrwyr baratoi cyfres o gyfieithiadau yn ymwneud â meysydd gwahanol a fydd yn berthnasol i waith y cyfieithydd proffesiynol yn y Gymru gyfoes.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd a seminarau/gweithdai
DULLIAU ASESU: Arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Swyddfa’r Ysgol (Ysgol y Gymraeg)
 
CY2166 - CYFLWYNIAD I HANES YR IAITH [INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF THE WELSH LANGUAGE]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
Cyflwyniad i ddatblygiad y Gymraeg o’r cyfnodau cynharaf hyd at y presennol yw’r modiwl hwn. Ar ôl trafod cydberthynas y Gymraeg ag ieithoedd eraill Ewrop, ac yn enwedig â’r ieithoedd Celtaidd eraill, byddwn yn olrhain agweddau ar ei hanes dros y canrifoedd. Nodweddion Cymraeg y cyfnod diweddar a gaiff y sylw pennaf a byddwn yn craffu ar y cyfnewidiadau a’r datblygiadau a effeithiodd arni ers y Deddfau Uno. Bydd pwys ar fethodoleg disgrifio amrywiadau ieithyddol a dehongli eu harwyddocâd.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd a seminarau.
DULLIAU ASESU: Traethawd hyd at 2,000 o eiriau (50%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr Diarmait Mac Giolla Chríost (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY1742 - CYFLWYNIAD I'R GYMRAEG [AN INTRODUCTION TO THE WELSH LANGUAGE]
Modiwl lefel 1 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
Prif nod y modiwl hwn yw cyflwyno gramadeg Cymraeg safonol cyfoes ynghyd a'r eirfa dechnegol berthnasol. Trwy hynny byddwch yn meithrin y gallu i adnabod, disgrifio a chynhyrchu ffurfiau safonol. Byddwch hefyd yn astudio cystrawennau sy'n wahanol yn y Gymraeg a'r Saesneg, a thrwy gyfrwng ymarferion cyfieithu fe'ch cyflwynir i rai o'r gwahaniaethau pwysicaf rhwng y ddwy iaith.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithiau a seminarau.
DULLIAU ASESU: Arholiad 2 awr (Hydref) (50%) ac archoliad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr Dylan Foster Evans (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3742 - CYFLWYNIAD I'R GYMRAEG [AN INTRODUCTION TO THE WELSH LANGUAGE]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithiau a seminarau.
DULLIAU ASESU: Arholiad 2 awr (Hydref) (50%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr Dylan Foster Evans (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3384 - CYMRAEG I OEDOLION [WELSH FOR ADULTS]
Modiwl lefel 3 Gwanwyn 10 credyd
Bydd y modiwl hwn yn rhoi cyflwyniad i’r prif ddamcaniaethau a methodolegau dysgu ynghylch Cymraeg i Oedolion. Gwneir hynny drwy gyfrwng darlithoedd, seminarau a gweithdai a thrwy arsylwi dosbarthiadau iaith. Byddwch hefyd yn astudio’r ffactorau sy’n allweddol i lwyddiant dosbarth iaith a thrwy hynny yn llunio gweithgareddau iaith sy’n addas i ddysgwyr. Bydd y modiwl hwn yn ddefnyddiol i’r rheini sydd â diddordeb mewn dysgu neu mewn gwaith ymchwil i faes Cymraeg i Oedolion neu gaffael ail iaith.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, seminarau, gweithdai ac arsylwi.
DULLIAU ASESU: Traethawd (Gwanwyn) (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Swyddfa’r Ysgol (Ysgol y Gymraeg)
 
CY1745 - CYMRU A'I DIWYLLIANT [WALES AND ITS CULTURE]
Modiwl lefel 1 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
Cyflwyniad i ddiwylliant Cymru a’i sefydliadau a fydd yn cwmpasu meysydd megis daearyddiaeth, hanes, gwleidyddiaeth, crefydd a bydolwg, yr Eisteddfod, bywyd ac arferion gwerin, cerddoriaeth a chynllunio ieithyddol.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, gwaith grŵp a sesiynau adborth.
DULLIAU ASESU: Prosiect (50%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr Diarmait Mac Giolla Chríost (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3745 - CYMRU A'I DIWYLLIANT [WALES AND ITS CULTURE]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, gwaith grŵp a sesiynau adborth.
DULLIAU ASESU: Prosiect (50%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr Diarmait Mac Giolla Chríost (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY2282 - CYNLLUNIO IEITHYDDOL [LANGUAGE PLANNING]
Modiwl lefel 3 Gwanwyn 10 credyd
Cyflwyniad i’r cyfnewidiadau cyfredol yn statws y Gymraeg a’i hadnoddau, ac o’r modd y llunnir polisïau iaith gan asiantau megis y Cynulliad Cenedlaethol, Bwrdd yr Iaith Gymraeg, a’r Mentrau Iaith. Gosodir y datblygiadau hyn mewn cyd-destun ehangach drwy ystyried yr hyn sydd yn digwydd mewn gwledydd eraill lle y siaredir ieithoedd lleafrifol, e.e. Catalonia, Gwlad y Basg, Quebec.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, seminarau, dosbarthiadau darllen.
DULLIAU ASESU: Traethawd hyd at 2,000 o eiriau (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Yr Athro Colin H. Williams (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY2318 - DADENI A DIWYGIAD 1550 - 1900 [RENAISSANCE AND REVIVAL 1550-1900]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
Cyflwyniad i brif fannau llenyddiaeth Gymraeg y cyfnod cyffrous a ffurfiannol rhwng y Dadeni Dysg a’r adfywiad llenyddol ar ddiwedd y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg. Astudir gwaith llenorion mor amrywiol eu dawn a’u cyfraniad â William Salesbury, Morgan Llwyd, Ellis Wynne, Goronwy Owen, Iolo Morganwg a Cheiriog.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithiau, seminarau a dosbarthiadau darllen.
DULLIAU ASESU: Traethawd hyd at 2,000 o eiriau (50%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr E. Wyn James (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY2679 - GWLEIDYDDIAETH A PHROPAGANDA YN LLENYDDIAETH GYMRAEG YR UGEINFED GANRIF [POLITICS & PROPAGANDA IN 20TH CENT WELSH LIT]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref 10 credyd
Mae llenyddiaeth Gymraeg yr ugeinfed ganrif yn gyforiog o wleidyddiaeth. Bydd y modiwl hwn yn codi cwr y llen ar draddodiadau gwleidyddol megis Cenedlaetholdeb a Phrydeindod, Heddychiaeth a Militariaeth, a hyd yn oed adar drycin Comiwnyddiaeth a Ffasgaeth, wrth iddynt ymrafael â’i gilydd am sylw yn llên y ganrif ddiwethaf. At hyn hefyd, bydd cyfle i ymateb i ddigwyddiadau gwleidyddol penodol o bwysigrwydd llenyddol, megis carchariad Saunders Lewis yn sgil llosgi’r Ysgol Fomio, ymgyrchoedd y mudiadau iaith, a’r ddau refferendwm datganoli.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd a seminarau.
DULLIAU ASESU: Traethawd hyd at 2,000 o eiriau (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr Simon Brooks (Ysgol y Gymraeg)
 
CY1081 - HANES LLENYDDIAETH GYMRAEG [THE HISTORY OF WELSH LITERATURE]
Modiwl lefel 1 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
Bwriad y modiwl yw cyflwyno’n gryno hanes llenyddiaeth Gymraeg o’r cyfnod cynharaf hyd at c.1900. Byddwn yn edrych ar ystod eang o ryddiaith a barddoniaeth, mewn fersiynau wedi eu diweddaru ond hefyd, lle bo’n briodol, yn y gwreiddiol. Byddwn yn trafod prif themâu a ffurfiau llenyddiaeth y Gymraeg ac yn trafod y berthynas rhwng newidiadau hanesyddol a datblygiadau llenyddol.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, dosbarthiadau darllen, a seminarau.
DULLIAU ASESU: Gwaith cwrs (50%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig. Modiwl ar gyfer myfyrwyr ail-iaith yw hwn.
Cysylltwch â: Swyddfa’r Ysgol (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3081 - HANES LLENYDDIAETH GYMRAEG [THE HISTORY OF WELSH LITERATURE]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, dosbarthiadau darllen, a seminarau.
DULLIAU ASESU: Gwaith cwrs (50%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig. Modiwl ar gyfer myfyrwyr ail-iaith yw hwn.
Cysylltwch â: Swyddfa’r Ysgol (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY2512 - HANES Y DDRAMA [HISTORY OF WELSH DRAMA]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref 10 credyd
Bwriad y modiwl hwn yw olrhain datblygiad y ddrama Gymraeg dros y canrifoedd, gan roi sylw arbennig i werth llenyddol dramâu Cymraeg ac i rai o ddramodwyr amlycaf yr ugeinfed ganrif hyd at tua’r 1970au, gan gynnwys D. T. Davies, J. Kitchener Davies, John Gwilym Jones a Gwenlyn Parry. (Ni roddir sylw manwl i waith Saunders Lewis yn y modiwl hwn, gan y neilltuir modiwl arall ar ei gyfer.)
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd a seminarau.
DULLIAU ASESU: Arholiad 2 awr (Hydref) (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr E Wyn James (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3560 - HUNANIAETH A DIWYLLIANT Y WLADFA [THE IDENTITY AND CULTURE OF THE WELSH COLONY IN PATAGONIA]
Modiwl lefel 3 Gwanwyn 10 credyd
Ers sefydlu’r Wladfa yn 1865 gan garfan fechan o Gymry, y mae hi wedi esgor ar amrywiaeth o ymatebion a theimladau. ‘Cymru fach dros y môr’, chwedl Lloyd George; darn o dir a ddylai fod o dan reolaeth y Wladwriaeth Genedlaethol ym marn swyddogion y llywodraeth yn Buenos Aires. Bron canrif a hanner ers glaniad y gwladfawyr cyntaf, y mae ymgais wladfaol fwyaf deheuol y Cymry wedi profi’n fenter â chanlyniadau hynod ddiddorol sy’n haeddu astudiaeth fanwl. Bwriad y modiwl hwn yw bwrw golwg ar y Wladfa ers ei sefydlu hyd at y presennol trwy ddefnyddio ystod eang o ffynonellau academaidd a chynnyrch creadigol gan awduron o Gymru a Phatagonia. Y nod fydd ystyried datblygiad y Wladfa er mwyn darganfod a thrafod ei nodweddion unigryw, ei statws mytholegol a’i rhwymau parhaol â Chymru ar draws y degawdau.
DULLIAU DYSGU:Darlithoedd, seminarau a dosbarthiadau darllen.
DULLIAU ASESU: Arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (100%).
AMODAU:Os bydd myfyrwyr nad ydynt wedi ennill cymhwyster Safon Uwch yn yr iaith yn dymuno dilyn y modiwl bydd yn rhaid iddynt fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â:Cysylltwch â: Swyddfa’r Ysgol (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3593 - IAITH, GWLEIDYDDIAETH A GWRTHDARO [LANGUAGE, POLITICS AND CONFLICT]
Modiwl lefel 3 Gwanwyn 10 credyd
Cyflwyniad i’r berthnas rhwng iaith, gwleidyddiaeth a gwrthdaro gan ganolbwyntio ar y cyfnod modern. Gosodir y datblygiadau hyn mewn cyd-destun cymharol, Ewropeaidd.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, seminarau a dosbarthiadau darllen.
DULLIAU ASESU: Arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr Diarmait Mac Giolla Chríost (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3591 - IAITH, Y DDINAS A CHYMDEITHAS [LANGUAGE, THE CITY AND SOCIETY]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref 10 credyd
Cyflwyniad i’r berthnas rhwng iaith, y ddinas a chymdeithas gan ganolbwyntio ar y cyfnod modern. Gosodir y datblygiadau hyn mewn cyd-destun cymharol, byd-eang.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, seminarau a dosbarthiadau darllen.
DULLIAU ASESU: Traethawd hyd at 2,000 o eiriau (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr Diarmait Mac Giolla Chríost (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY2468 - LLEN Y DDINAS [URBAN LITERATURE]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref 10 credyd
Delwedd dra chyffredin yn ein llenyddiaeth yw’r un rhamantaidd honno o Gymru yn wlad yn llawn dyffrynnoedd hardd, nentydd swynol a gwladwyr gwâr. Ond y gwir yw fod i’r ddinas le allweddol yn natblygiad ein llenyddiaeth, yn y gorffennol ac at y dyfodol. Yn y modiwl hwn edrychir ar ymateb y Cymry i’r bywyd trefol a dinesig dros y canrifoedd, gan fanylu’n arbennig ar gyfraniad Llundain a Chaerdydd i lenyddiaeth Gymraeg. Edrychir hefyd ar bwysigrwydd y ddinas i ddatblygiad Moderniaeth ac Ôl-foderniaeth yn ein llenyddiaeth.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, seminarau a dosbarthiadau darllen.
DULLIAU ASESU: Traethawd hyd at 2,000 o eiriau (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr Simon Brooks (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY1743 - LLENYDDIAETH GYMRAEG [WELSH LITERATURE]
Modiwl lefel 1 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
Modiwl yw hwn sy’n hyfforddi myfyrwyr sut i astudio llenyddiaeth. Mae pwyslais arbennig ar lenyddiaeth o ddechrau’r ugeinfed ganrif ymlaen ac ar ddulliau beirniadaeth lenyddol.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Seminarau, dosbarthiadau darllen a darlithiau.
DULLIAU ASESU: Gwaith cwrs (50%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Swyddfa’r Ysgol (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3743 - LLENYDDIAETH GYMRAEG [WELSH LITERATURE]
Modiwl lefel 3 Gwanwyn 20 credyd
DULLIAU DYSGU: Seminarau, dosbarthiadau darllen a darlithiau.
DULLIAU ASESU: Gwaith cwrs (50%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Swyddfa’r Ysgol (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY1584 - LLENYDDIAETH GYMRAEG FODERN [MODERN WELSH LITERATURE]
Modiwl lefel 1 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
Mae’r modiwl hwn yn cyflwyno llenyddiaeth Gymraeg o ddechrau’r ugeinfed ganrif ymlaen a dulliau beirniadaeth lenyddol trwy astudio amrywiaeth o ffurfiau, yn farddoniaeth, rhyddiaith a dramâu. Bydd pwyslais ar drafod a mynegi ymateb yn y dosbarth.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Cyfuniad o ddarlithoedd a seminarau/dosbarthiadau darllen.
DULLIAU ASESU: Gwaith cwrs (50%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn)(50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig. Modiwl ar gyfer myfyrwyr ail-iaith yw hwn.
Cysylltwch â: Swyddfa’r Ysgol (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3584 - LLENYDDIAETH GYMRAEG FODERN [MODERN WELSH LITERATURE]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
DULLIAU DYSGU: Cyfuniad o ddarlithoedd a seminarau/dosbarthiadau darllen.
DULLIAU ASESU: Gwaith cwrs (50%) ac arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn)(50%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig. Modiwl ar gyfer myfyrwyr ail-iaith yw hwn.
Cysylltwch â: Swyddfa’r Ysgol (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY1744 - O DESTUN I DRAETHAWD [FROM TEXT TO ESSAY]
Modiwl lefel 1 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
Nod y modiwl hwn yw datblygu eich gallu i greu darn gorffenedig o waith wedi ei seilio ar amrywiaeth o ffynonellau gwahanol. Byddwch yn dysgu sut y mae syniadau a dadleuon yn cael eu llunio a’u defnyddio wrth ysgrifennu’n academaidd, a byddwch yn defnyddio’r wybodaeth honno i ysgrifennu eich traethawd safonol eich hun. Byddwch yn cael y cyfle i ddadansoddi amrywiaeth o ffynonellau ac yn dysgu sut mae defnyddio’r profiad hwnnw er mwyn cyfansoddi traethodau effeithiol.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, gwaith grŵp, gweithdai a tiwtora un-wrth-un.
DULLIAU ASESU: Gwaith cwrs (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Angharad George (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3744 - O DESTUN I DRAETHAWD [FROM TEXT TO ESSAY]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, gwaith grŵp, gweithdai a tiwtora un-wrth-un.
DULLIAU ASESU: Gwaith cwrs (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Angharad George (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3951 - RHYDDIAITH DDIWEDDAR [RECENT PROSE]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref 10 credyd
Mae’r modiwl hwn yn edrych yn fanwl ar y datblygiadau cyffrous yn y nofel a’r stori fer ers dechrau’r 1980au, gan astudio awduron megis Wiliam Owen Roberts, Angharad Tomos, Robin Llywelyn a Mihangel Morgan.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd a dosbarthiadau darllen.
DULLIAU ASESU: Arholiad 2 awr (Hydref) (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr Simon Brooks (Ysgol y Gymraeg)
 
CY2678 - SAUNDERS LEWIS
Modiwl lefel 3 Gwanwyn 10 credyd
Cyflwyniad i fywyd a gwaith un o’r ffigurau mwyaf dylanwadol a dadleuol yn holl hanes Cymru. Canolbwyntir yn arbennig ar ei gyfraniad fel llenor a beirniad llenyddol.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, seminarau a dosbarthiadau darllen.
DULLIAU ASESU: Arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i fyfyrwyr fodloni’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Dr E. Wyn James (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY1495 - SGILIAU CYFATHREBU [COMMUNICATION SKILLS]
Modiwl lefel 1 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
Hyrwyddo sgiliau cyfathrebu yn y Gymraeg, ar lafar ac yn ysgrifenedig yw nod y modiwl hwn. Rhoddir sylw i sgiliau ysgrifennu traethodau, caffael gwybodaeth ac yn arbennig i fater Cymraeg addas a phriodol i fynegi barn, trafod amrywiol bynciau a chyflwyno gwybodaeth, ar lafar ac yn ysgrifenedig.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, gweithdai ac asesu ffurfiannol.
DULLIAU ASESU: Profion dosbarth (20%), prawf llafar (30%), tasgau ysgrifenedig (40%), strategaeth datblygu personol (10%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig. Modiwl ar gyfer myfyrwyr ail-iaith yw hwn.
Cysylltwch â: Lowri Wyn Davies (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3495 - SGILIAU CYFATHREBU [COMMUNICATION SKILLS]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, gweithdai ac asesu ffurfiannol.
DULLIAU ASESU: Profion dosbarth (20%), prawf llafar (30%), tasgau ysgrifenedig (40%), strategaeth datblygu personol (10%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig. Modiwl ar gyfer myfyrwyr ail-iaith yw hwn.
Cysylltwch â: Lowri Wyn Davies (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY2123 - SGRIPTIO [SCRIPTWRITING]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref a Gwanwyn 20 credyd
Meithrin a datblygu sgiliau sgriptio dramâu, yn bennaf ar gyfer y teledu, a chan gynnwys sgriptio opera sebon.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd, seminarau a gweithdai.
DULLIAU ASESU: Prawf dosbarth 2 awr (Hydref) (20%), Portffolio o waith creadigol (80%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch ag: Yr Athro Sioned Davies (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY2617 - Y CANU ARWROL [HEROIC POETRY]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref 10 credyd
Ai’r Canu Arwrol yw man cychwyn ein traddodiad llenyddol? Bwriad y modiwl yw astudio’n fanwl gasgliad o’r farddoniaeth hynaf yn yr iaith Gymraeg, sef gwaith Aneirin a Thaliesin, ynghyd â gweithiau eraill sy’n berthnasol i’r thema arwrol, megis ‘Ymddiddan Llywarch a Gwên’ a ‘Marwnad Gwên’ o’r canu englynol cynnar. Byddwn yn edrych ar gwestiynau elfennol megis sut y mae mynd ati i ddyddio’r cerddi a sut y mae ceisio pennu pwy yn union oedd yr awduron. Rhoddwn gryn sylw i ddelfrydau arbennig y canu, yn enwedig yng nghyd-destun y cysyniad o ‘lenyddiaeth arwrol’. Edrychwn ar y canu mewn perthynas â hanes Cymru ac mewn perthynas â llenyddiaethau eraill ledled Ewrop.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd a seminarau.
DULLIAU ASESU: Arholiad 2 awr (Hydref) (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig. Modiwl ar gyfer myfyrwyr ail-iaith yw hwn.
Cysylltwch â: Dr Dylan Foster Evans (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3447 - Y CHWEDL ARTHURAIDD [THE ARTHURIAN LEGEND]
Modiwl lefel 3 Gwanwyn 10 credyd
Pwy oedd Arthur? Yn y modiwl hwn astudir cynnwys a datblygiad y Chwedl Arthuraidd yng Nghymru gan dynnu’n bennaf oddi ar ryddiaith y cyfnod canol. Darperir y sgiliau angenrheidiol i ddarllen y ffynonellau a chyflwynir y prif ddamcaniaethau yn y maes.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd a seminarau.
DULLIAU ASESU: Arholiad 2 awr (Gwanwyn) (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Yr Athro Sioned Davies (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
CY3404 - Y FERCH YN YR OESOEDD CANOL [WOMEN IN MEDIEVAL WALES]
Modiwl lefel 3 Hydref 10 credyd
Y mae’r modiwl hwn yn astudio’r portread o’r ferch yng Nghymru yn yr Oesoedd Canol trwy gyfrwng ffynonellau fel y cyfreithiau, y chwedlau, barddoniaeth, testunau hanesyddol a chrefyddol.
DULLIAU DYSGU: Darlithoedd a seminarau.
DULLIAU ASESU: Traethawd hyd at 2,000 o eiriau (100%).
AMODAU: Rhaid i’r myfyrwyr foddhau’r Ysgol ynghylch safon eu Cymraeg ysgrifenedig.
Cysylltwch â: Yr Athro Sioned Davies (Ysgol y Gymraeg).
 
 

APPENDIX 1

PROGRAMMES WHICH PERMIT THE STUDY OF FREE-STANDING MODULES

NB: All programmes of study, including free-standing modules, are subject to approval by your Head of School or his/her nominee.
Programme No. of Modules Year(s)
ANCIENT HISTORY, BA SINGLE, INTEGRATED AND JOINT HONOURS UP TO 2 MODULES OVER 2 YEARS 2 & 3
ARCHAEOLOGY, BA SINGLE, INTEGRATED & JOINT HONOURS 40 CREDITS OVER 2 YEARS MAXIMUM 2 & 3
ARCHAEOLOGY, BSc 40 CREDITS OVER 2 YEARS MAXIMUM 2 & 3
ASTROPHYSICS, BSc ONE MODULE 1(AUTUMN) 2(SPRING)
ASTROPHYSICS, MPHYS ONE MODULE 1(AUTUMN) 2(SPRING)
CHEMISTRY, BSc 2 MODULES (ONE IN EACH SEMESTER) 1
CHEMISTRY, BSc 1 MODULE 2(AUTUMN)
CHEMISTRY WITH A YEAR ABROAD, MCHEM 2 MODULES (ONE IN EACH SEMESTER) 1
CHEMISTRY WITH A YEAR ABROAD, MCHEM 1 MODULE 2(AUTUMN)
CHEMISTRY WITH A YEAR IN INDUSTRY, MCHEM 2 MODULES (ONE IN EACH SEMESTER) 1
CHEMISTRY WITH INDUSTRIAL EXPERIENCE, BSc 2 MODULES (ONE IN EACH SEMESTER) 1
CHEMISTRY WITH INDUSTRIAL EXPERIENCE, BSc 1 MODULE 2(AUTUMN)
COMMUNICATION, BA 40 CREDITS OVER 2 YEARS 2 & 3
CULTURAL CRITICISM, BA JOINT HONOURS N/A 2 & 3
EARTH SCIENCES,MESCI 20 CREDITS/YEAR 1,2, 3 & 4
EDUCATION, BA SINGLE HONOURS 20 CREDITS/YEAR UP TO 40 CREDITS YEAR 1 IN NATIONAL CURRICULUM SUBJECT 2 & 3
ENGINEERING PHYSICS, MPhys 1 FREE STANDING LANG MODULE 2 (AUTUMN)
ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDIES, BA SINGLE HONOURS 40 CREDITS OVER 2 YEARS 2 & 3
ENGLISH LITERATURE, BA SINGLE HONOURS 20 CREDITS/YEAR 2 & 3
ENVIRONMENTAL GEOSCIENCE, BSc, MESCI 20 CREDITS/YEAR 1,2, 3 & 4
EXPLORATION AND RESOURCE GEOLOGY, BSc, MESCI 20 CREDITS/YEAR 1,2, 3 & 4
GEOLOGY, BSc, MESCI 20 CREDITS/YEAR 1,2, 3 & 4
HISTORY OF IDEAS AND PHILOSOPHY, BA INTEGRATED HONS 20 CREDITS/YEAR 2 & 3
HISTORY OF IDEAS, BA JOINT HONOURS 20 CREDITS OVER 2 YEARS 2 & 3
HISTORY, BA SINGLE & JOINT HONOURS 30 CREDITS EACH YEAR 2 & 3
JOURNALISM, FILM AND BROADCASTING, BA SINGLE HONOURS N/A 3
JOURNALISM, FILM AND MEDIA, BA SINGLE HONOURS N/A 2 & 3
LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION, BA 40 CREDITS OVER 2 YEARS 2 & 3
LANGUAGE STUDIES, BA JOINT HONOURS 40 CREDITS OVER 2 YEARS 2 & 3
MARINE GEOGRAPHY, BSC (F841) 20 CREDITS EACH YEAR 2 & 3
MARINE GEOGRAPHY, BSC (F821) 20 CREDITS EACH YEAR 2 & 4
MATHEMATICS, BSc SINGLE HONOURS 10 CREDITS 1 & 2
MATHEMATICS AND ITS APPLICATIONS, BSc 10 CREDITS 1 & 2
MATHEMATICS, OPERATIONAL RESEARCH AND STATISTICS, BSc 10 CREDITS 1 & 2
MEDIEVAL HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY, BA 30 CREDITS EACH YEAR 2 & 3
MUSIC, BA SINGLE HONOURS UP TO 20 CREDITS/YEAR 2 & 3
PHILOSOPHY, SINGLE HONOURS BA 20 CREDITS EACH YEAR 2 & 3
PHYSICS WITH ASTRONOMY, BSc ONE MODULE 1 (AUTUMN) 2 (SPRING)
PHYSICS WITH ASTRONOMY, MPHYS ONE MODULE 1 (AUTUMN)
PHYSICS WITH MEDICAL PHYSICS, BSc ONE MODULE 1 (AUTUMN) 2 (SPRING)
PHYSICS, BSc ONE MODULE 1 (AUTUMN) 2 (SPRING)
PHYSICS, MPHYS ONE MODULE 1 (AUTUMN) 2 (SPRING)
PRELIMINARY YEAR N/A 1
RELIGIOUS AND THEOLOGICAL STUDIES, BA 20 CREDITS OVER 2 YEARS 2 & 3
SOCIAL POLICY, SINGLE & JOINT HONOURS (INCLUDES CRIMINOLOGY) BSCECON & BA 20 CREDITS 1
SOCIOLOGY, SINGLE & JOINT HONOURS (INCLUDES CRIMINOLOGY) BSCECON & BA 20 CREDITS 1
THEORETICAL AND COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS, BSc ONE MODULE 1 (AUTUMN) 2 (SPRING)
WELSH HISTORY, BA JOINT HONOURS 30 CREDITS EACH YEAR 2 & 3
Y GYMRAEG, BA ANRHYDEDD SENGL WELSH, BA SINGLE HONOURS HYD AT 40 CREDYD DROS 2 FLYNEDD / UP TO 40 CREDITS OVER 2 YEARS 2 & 3