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Cymraeg

Closing the food gap

06 May 2010

Mark WinneMark Winne

A long-time US food activist and author is set to reveal what he believes to be the key to reducing hunger, food insecurity and obesity in America, and whether any comparisons can be made with the UK.

America may be known as the land of plenty yet food deserts, food insecurity, and food banks are common for one class of Americans, while organically produced food is ever more prevalent for another. The question of how to redress this balance will be investigated in a public lecture at the University by Mark Winne, Food Policy Council Director for the Community Food Security Coalition (US) and author of 'Closing the Food Gap'.

Held as part of the School of City and Regional Planning’s Innovation and Engagement programme, Mark’s lecture will reveal the chasm between the two food systems of America - the one for the poor and the one for everyone else, explore the route of these food disparities, look at strategies to reduce it, and consider comparisons between the US and UK and will be chaired by Professor Kevin Morgan.

Professor Morgan, himself an author of books about public food and the challenge of sustainable development, said: "Next to air and water, food is a basic human need, yet patterns of food consumption in America have become one of the most visible signs of inequality in the country, but they are not alone. This is a unique opportunity to hear some compelling solutions for making local, organic, and highly nutritious food available to everyone, which can be applicable on both sides of the Atlantic."

Mark Winne has worked for 35 years to close the food gap in America. From organizing breakfast programs for low-income children in Maine to developing innovative national food policies in Washington, DC, Mark has dedicated his professional life and writing to finding local, state, and federal solutions to America’s food disparities.

The public lecture will take place on Tuesday 11th May at 5.30pm in the University’s Glamorgan Building on King Edward V11 Avenue in Cardiff. The event is free and open to members of the public. Places can be booked by contacting Evelyn Osborne via email at OsborneE1@cardiff.ac.uk