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Welsh Architecture from the Salisbury Collection

A Selection of Original Artworks

Curated by Mark Baker

School of History, Archaeology and Religion

 

The original artworks on display are a selection images from the scrapbooks of Enoch Robert Gibbon Salisbury (1819-1890), a native of Bagillt, Flintshire, whose private library forms the basis of the Salisbury Collection, at both Cardiff and Bangor Universities.  

 

Exhibition case

 

The exhibition features the earliest known image of Hafod, Aberystwyth, painted by a visitor who captured the building process, recording the phasing of this important house. It is complemented by a copy of Cumberland’s guidebook and plan of the estate, together with an engraving of the completed Hafod.  

An attempt to describe Hafod: and the neighbouring scenes about the bridge over the Funack, commonly called the Devil's Bridge, in the county of Cardigan: an ancient seat belonging to Thomas Johnes, Esq. Member for the County of Radnor
By George Cumberland (1754-1848)
Published 1796

Hafod, Aberyswyth, Ceredigion
Signed S. Walker
Circa 1784-5
Watercolour on card
142mm by 95mm
Salisbury Cardiganshire Volume

This small watercolour is the earliest known image of Hafod. The view is taken from Middle Hill, looking at the south-east face of the house with its colonnaded ground floor, while the south-west front with two corner pavilions is seen in perspective. The most exciting feature, though, is the large ‘wing’ to the right. We believe this to be the old manor house of Hafod Uchtryd, of which no other views are known. The new house seems to be butted up against it, probably for the convenience of using it as accommodation during building work. This would make the date of the picture ca.1784-5. Shortly afterwards the old house must have been demolished, so that the north-east front of the new could be completed, with matching pavilions Hafod was demolished in the 1950s and currently lies as a pile of rubble. The Hafod Trust, since the early 1990s, has been rescuing the designed landscape from dereliction.  

 

Hafod, Aberyswyth, Ceredigion. Signed S. Walker. Circa 1784-5. Watercolour on card. 142mm by 95mm. Salisbury Cardiganshire Volume

 

Hafod, seat of His Grace the Duke of Newcastle
After Lord W. Clinton, engraved by W.L. Walton
Circa 1850
Salisbury Cardiganshire Volume

 

Four engravings are taken from ‘A New Map of Denbighshire and Flintshire’, by William Williams and John Felton, engraved by J. Senex. The map’s subscribers had their houses and heraldry illustrated around the border.  The exhibition also features the earliest known image of Dyffryn Aled, Llansannan, a house now demolished.  

 

Dyffryn Aled, Llansannan, Denbighshire, seat of Thomas Wynne
After William Williams, engraved by J. Senex
Circa 1710
113mm by 80mm
Salisbury Denbighshire Volume

Marle Hall, near Llandudno
After William Williams, engraved by J. Senex
Circa 1710
113mm by 80mm
Salisbury Denbighshire Volume

Trevalyn Hall, Rossett,
After William Williams, engraved by J. Senex
Circa 1710
113mm by 80mm
Salisbury Flintshire Volume

Llannerch Hall, near St. Asaph
After William Williams, engraved by J. Senex
Circa 1710
113mm by 80mm
Salisbury Denbighshire Volume

Gresford Lodge, Denbighshire, the Seat of William Parry
Sir Foster Cunliffe (1755-1834) of Acton Park, Wrexham  
Circa 1795
Pencil on card
123mm by 82mm
Salisbury Denbighshire Volume

 

The three watercolours below show places in the Vale of Clwyd associated with Dr. Samuel Johnson (1709-1784).  Although inscribed as Bach-y-Graig, the house depicted does not show Sir Richard Clough’s sixteenth-century brick mansion, which had been inherited and subsequently demolished by Johnson’s friend, Mrs. Hester Piozzi.  Gresford Lodge, near Wrexham, was built circa 1790 and attributed to society architect Sir Jeffry Wyattville (1766-1840).  This small pencil sketch was executed by Sir Foster Cunliffe (1755-1834), who moved to North Wales in the late-1780s.  Gresford Lodge was demolished circa 1956.                                                                                                                       

Monument erected by Colonel John Myddleton on the banks of the River Ystrad to commemorate the visit of Dr. Samuel Johnson in 1774 to Gwaenynog Hall, near Denbigh
Unknown artist
Circa 1810
Watercolour on paper
228mm by 140mm
Salisbury Denbighshire Volume

Distant view of a house titled as Bach-y-Graig, Tremeirchion, Denbighshire
Unknown artist
Circa 1830
Watercolour on paper
268mm by 203mm
Salisbury Denbighshire Volume

Called Bach-y-Graig, Tremeirchion, Denbighshire
Unknown artist
Circa 1830
Watercolour on paper
235mm by 143mm
Salisbury Denbighshire Volume

 

Called Bach-y-Graig, Tremeirchion, Denbighshire. Unknown artist. Circa 1830. Watercolour on paper. 235mm by 143mm. Salisbury Denbighshire Volume.

 

Both pencil sketches are by the artist Julia Mann, who visited South Wales during December 1831. On the left, Oxwich Castle, a Tudor courtyard house, was built by the Mansel family during the sixteenth-century. Their tenancy was short-lived, as the house became a romantic ruin during the eighteenth century, and a popular destination on the picturesque tourist trail. Manorbier Castle, on the right, was part of this circuit, claiming fame as being the birthplace of Gerald of Wales. The castle survived intact until the Civil War when it was slighted, afterwards becoming derelict.

Oxwich Castle, Oxwich Bay, Glamorganshire
Attributed to Julia Mann
Dated December 1831
Pencil on card
245mm by 176mm
Salisbury Glamorganshire Volume

Manorbier Castle, from North Pembrokeshire
Signed Julia Mann
Dated December 1831
Pencil on card
243mm by 176mm
Salisbury Pembrokeshire Volume

 

Manorbier Castle, from North Pembrokeshire. Signed Julia Mann. Dated December 1831. Pencil on card. 243mm by 176mm. Salisbury Pembrokeshire Volume.

 

The image below features a mystery house, enigmatically titled ‘Mrs Woodman’s House, Monmouth.’ The pen and ink sketch is hastily executed but one can discern a large gabled house, together with what maybe a summer house to the right, surrounded by woodland. This image forms part of a larger collection of drawings taken from a tour through Wales.

Mrs Woodman’s (?) House, Monmouth
By Robson
Pen and ink on paper
203mm by 268mm
Salisbury Monmouthshire Volume

Below is an illustration of the ruins of Neath Abbey, painted by the same artist as the Hafod watercolour. It appears to have originated as a set of images depicting a tour through Wales during the mid-1780s.  The artist has included in the background of the painting a depiction of The Gnoll, home to the Mackworth family, which was unfortunately demolished in 1957.

The ruins of Neath Abbey, with the mansion of The Gnoll.
Attributed to S. Walker.
Circa 1785.
Watercolour on card.
155mm by 100mm
Salisbury Glamorganshire Volume

 

The ruins of Neath Abbey, with the mansion of The Gnoll. Attributed to S. Walker. 
Circa 1785. Watercolour on card. 155mm by 100mm. Salisbury Glamorganshire Volume.