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Divine Dimension

Curated by Corbett Miteff

School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies

 

Henry Cornelius Agrippa, Occult Philosophy (1651)

The secrets of God were hidden deep within certain characters and seals.  The Malachim alphabet was considered to be the language of angels and messengers.

 

Henry Cornelius Agrippa, Occult Philosophy (1651)

 

John Pennethorne, The Geometry and Optics of Ancient Architecture Illustrated by Examples From Thebes, Athens and Rome (1878)

Self-published by the author in limited number.  This work shows how the Egyptians used geometric shapes in temples.  It’s believed the patterns would help navigate the soul to the afterworld.

 

Child’s Bible Narrative, n.d.

Chiaroscuro is defined as a contrast between light and dark.  The strong illumination between light and dark helps create depth on the page.

 

Child’s Bible Narrative, n.d.

 

W. B. Yeats, Mythologies (1962)

In Anima Mundi Yeats travels between the physical world and the spiritual world in order to confront his anti-self, the daimon; it is there he discusses artistic creativity.

 

George Herbert, The Temple: Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations (1860)

Pattern poems help create dimensions through typographical pictograms.  The visual shape created by the physicality of words and sentences adds symbolic meaning.

 

George Herbert, The Temple: Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations (1860)

 

Margaret Gatty, Parables From Nature (1899)

In ‘A Lesson of Faith’ a distressed Caterpillar is grounded and forced to feed cabbage leaves to butterfly eggs; however, Lark discusses the idea of metamorphism with Caterpillar.  

 

W. O. Hassall, The Holkham Bible Picture Book (1954)

Early Christian tradition used metaphysical mathematics in order to understand the nature of God because they believed God was the Divine Geometer.  

 

W. O. Hassall, The Holkham Bible Picture Book (1954)